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Actually, two other shows come to mind.

I doubt it's "My Mother the Car" since the unseen star was a woman.

"Mr. Ed"?  (Obviously, the horse was onscreen, but not his voice actor.)

George

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If not Mr Ed, how about "KNIGHT RIDER"?    "Michael Knight" and KITT  are the 2 principal characters, and we see the Hoff but not KITT's voice actor. 

(Sorry I'm not checking in that often. My internet access was down, and now it's intermittent so it's up and down.)

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Knight Rider is correct.

David Hasselhoff's ex wife, Catherine Hickland, later married soap opera actor Michael Knight.

William Daniels, voice of KITT, is never credited.

 

--Raf

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Next show.

The address of the main characters- and the setting for many scenes-  was 328 Chauncey Street, in Brooklyn.

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The address of the main characters- and the setting for many scenes-  was 328 Chauncey Street, in Brooklyn.

The main restaurant mentioned was "the Hong Kong Gardens."    One character didn't seem to wear a watch, but could tell the time by smelling out his window.  They had a Chinese take-out place downstairs, and-they cooked by a strict schedule.  So, based on the dish he could smell, and whether he was at his own window or his downstairs neighbor, he could tell what time it was, unless someone ordered a family special, which threw him off completely.

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You had me at Chauncey St., my boy.

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The address of the main characters- and the setting for many scenes-  was 328 Chauncey Street, in Brooklyn.

The main restaurant mentioned was "the Hong Kong Gardens."    One character didn't seem to wear a watch, but could tell the time by smelling out his window.  They had a Chinese take-out place downstairs, and-they cooked by a strict schedule.  So, based on the dish he could smell, and whether he was at his own window or his downstairs neighbor, he could tell what time it was, unless someone ordered a family special, which threw him off completely.

 

Although none of the characters were astronauts, and despite all of the scenes taking place on Earth, there were frequent mentions of one of the 4 main characters possibly being sent to the Moon or going there- some of them outright, some of them rephrased but obvious in context.

BTW, not really a clue per se, but I was surprised that the title of this series actually can translate properly into Spanish without losing meaning or connotation.

 

Depending on how you define the concept, this was either a short-lived show, or a very long-lived show.

 

Some time before this show, 2 of the main characters had used "pet names" for each other-  "Buttercup" and "Bunny."    Another of the principal cast was an "engineer of subterranean sanitation."

 

Edited by WordWolf
Added another clue.

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The address of the main characters- and the setting for many scenes-  was 328 Chauncey Street, in Brooklyn.

The main restaurant mentioned was "the Hong Kong Gardens."    One character didn't seem to wear a watch, but could tell the time by smelling out his window.  They had a Chinese take-out place downstairs, and-they cooked by a strict schedule.  So, based on the dish he could smell, and whether he was at his own window or his downstairs neighbor, he could tell what time it was, unless someone ordered a family special, which threw him off completely.

 

Although none of the characters were astronauts, and despite all of the scenes taking place on Earth, there were frequent mentions of one of the 4 main characters possibly being sent to the Moon or going there- some of them outright, some of them rephrased but obvious in context.

BTW, not really a clue per se, but I was surprised that the title of this series actually can translate properly into Spanish without losing meaning or connotation.

 

Depending on how you define the concept, this was either a short-lived show, or a very long-lived show.

 

Some time before this show, 2 of the main characters had used "pet names" for each other-  "Buttercup" and "Bunny."    Another of the principal cast was an "engineer of subterranean sanitation."

 

This show is so famous that the people who come up with the official names for hurricanes and tropical storms set aside one year to name them after characters in this show.  They alternated between male and female names.  Unfortunately for one of the principal characters, her name was skipped for that reason, and "Tommy" was the name they used- after the little neighbor who left his realistic-looking water pistol behind, resulting in a plot point in one episode.

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3 hours ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

The Honeymooners

"To the moon, Alice!  TO THE MOON!!!"  :jump:

George

YES!    

Ralph kept shaking his fist and threatening to send her to The Moon.  Eventually, the shorthand became "Bang! Zoom!" with a mimed punch and mimed escape velocity.   Once, Saturday Night Live's news segment talked about some woman astronaut in the news.  They said she was joining the ranks of Sally Ride, and Alice Kramden, who was sent to The Moon by her husband in 1954 (or some similar year.)

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9 hours ago, WordWolf said:

The address of the main characters- and the setting for many scenes-  was 328 Chauncey Street, in Brooklyn.

The main restaurant mentioned was "the Hong Kong Gardens."    One character didn't seem to wear a watch, but could tell the time by smelling out his window.  They had a Chinese take-out place downstairs, and-they cooked by a strict schedule.  So, based on the dish he could smell, and whether he was at his own window or his downstairs neighbor, he could tell what time it was, unless someone ordered a family special, which threw him off completely.

 

Although none of the characters were astronauts, and despite all of the scenes taking place on Earth, there were frequent mentions of one of the 4 main characters possibly being sent to the Moon or going there- some of them outright, some of them rephrased but obvious in context.

BTW, not really a clue per se, but I was surprised that the title of this series actually can translate properly into Spanish without losing meaning or connotation.

 

Depending on how you define the concept, this was either a short-lived show, or a very long-lived show.

 

Some time before this show, 2 of the main characters had used "pet names" for each other-  "Buttercup" and "Bunny."    Another of the principal cast was an "engineer of subterranean sanitation."

 

This show is so famous that the people who come up with the official names for hurricanes and tropical storms set aside one year to name them after characters in this show.  They alternated between male and female names.  Unfortunately for one of the principal characters, her name was skipped for that reason, and "Tommy" was the name they used- after the little neighbor who left his realistic-looking water pistol behind, resulting in a plot point in one episode.

The Kramdens and Nortons lived at that address, with the Nortons living directly upstairs, and shouted at in front of the fire escape.    Ralph's idea of a night out kept invoking going to the Hong Kong Gardens.   (I don't remember ever seeing a scene there.)   Norton could tell the time by the smell of the Chinese food.    Once, he stopped a train conductor. Instead of asking him to consult his pocket watch for the time, he asked if there were any Chinese restaurants in the area.  :)

I was surprised that Spanish has both the concept of the honeymoon (which translates word-for-word as "luna de miel" , moon of honey)  but also has a word for honeymooners (something like "mieleneros".)    The show was short-lived because it was 39 episodes long.  It's been in syndication for over 50 years, which is a long time for a show.

Ed Norton once described his job (he works in the sewer)  as an "engineer of subterranean sanitation."   Pet names got slightly confused.  Ralph told Norton he'd call Alice what he called her when courting- "little buttercup."  "No, wait, she used to call ME "Buttercup", I used to call her  'Bunny.'   What's so funny, Norton?"   "Back then, you were a little cup of butter, but now you're a whole tub of lard!!!!"        Another episode, Ralph made a recording for Alice to apologize to her.  He began with "Hello, Bunny?  This is old Buttercup...."  and continued from there, starting with how they used to call each other that.

The year the hurricanes all got named after the show,  TRIXIE (Ed's wife)  got left out when they got to the letter "T".  I thought they should make an obvious exception.  Interestingly, Ralph and Ed's bowling team was "the Hurricanes."    It came up when Ralph's team jacket was in the wash just before a game.  "HOW WILL PEOPLE KNOW I'M A HURRICANE?"  "Just open your mouth!"  

 

Ok, George.

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7 hours ago, WordWolf said:

 The show was short-lived because it was 39 episodes long.  It's been in syndication for over 50 years, which is a long time for a show.

Actually, I thought you meant all the later Jackie Gleason episodes as part of the "long time."  Anyway,

 

This "prequel" series lasted one season longer than the original.

The opening credits are for a show about a fake ship, named after a real ship, which is named after a fake ship, that is named after the fake ship, for which the show is named.

George

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On 10/4/2019 at 9:18 PM, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Actually, I thought you meant all the later Jackie Gleason episodes as part of the "long time."  Anyway,

 

This "prequel" series lasted one season longer than the original.

The opening credits are for a show about a fake ship, named after a real ship, which is named after a fake ship, that is named after the fake ship, for which the show is named.

George

I'm thinking that this is the prequel "Enterprise", which outlasted the original "Star Trek" series' 3 seasons.

There were different ships called  "Enterprise", including a real space shuttle named after the Star Trek ship, and so on.

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Ok, here's another round-up round.   Answer any of these correctly to take the round.  We're on game shows this time.

A) This British game show is not about people giving technically correct answers.  It is far more concerned that the answers not be cliched (while being wrong)  and that the answers given be INTERESTING.  So, interesting trivia is worth points even if it did nothing to answer the question.   Cliches are punished with a foghorn/ klaxon-like sound while the monitors behind the players displays the cliche.   Returning players who are predictable while being wrong can lose points quite easily.  (My favorite example....One comedienne was fond of making jokes at her own expense.  "What was The Great Disappointment?"  Comedienne: "Have you been talking to my husband?"   *KLAXON*  *the sentence "Have you been talking to my husband?"  appeared on the monitors* ) Players are comedians, actors, and minor celebrities, occasionally including a PhD whose known in the UK. 

B) This British game show pits families against each other in attempts to answer more questions, and outscore all other families, to win a prize like a trip to the Kennedy Space Center. 

C) This US game show pit children against each other, answering incredibly difficult questions.  An eidetic memory was quite useful.  Neil Patrick Harris hosted this one.  Each episode had 2 teams of 3 kids pitted against each other, with the kids getting to name their team. 

D)  This US game show from decades ago was the only game show that was set in Oahu, and was the only game show filmed entirely on location in Hawaii.  It was hosted by Bob Eubanks and the theme song was composed by Alan Thicke.

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

No idea yet, unless (D) is The Newlywed Game.

George

It is not. Eubanks hosted quite a few game shows.  The location of the one I mentioned is definitely a clue to which game show it is.  (I sometimes suspect I'm the only one who remembers it who didn't work on it.  Haven't seen it since it aired back then, either.)

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A) This British game show is not about people giving technically correct answers.  It is far more concerned that the answers not be cliched (while being wrong)  and that the answers given be INTERESTING.  So, interesting trivia is worth points even if it did nothing to answer the question.   Cliches are punished with a foghorn/ klaxon-like sound while the monitors behind the players displays the cliche.   Returning players who are predictable while being wrong can lose points quite easily.  (My favorite example....One comedienne was fond of making jokes at her own expense.  "What was The Great Disappointment?"  Comedienne: "Have you been talking to my husband?"   *KLAXON*  *the sentence "Have you been talking to my husband?"  appeared on the monitors* ) Players are comedians, actors, and minor celebrities, occasionally including a PhD whose known in the UK. 

B) This British game show pits families against each other in attempts to answer more questions, and outscore all other families, to win a prize like a trip to the Kennedy Space Center. 

C) This US game show pit children against each other, answering incredibly difficult questions.  An eidetic memory was quite useful.  Neil Patrick Harris hosted this one.  Each episode had 2 teams of 3 kids pitted against each other, with the kids getting to name their team. 

D)  This US game show from decades ago was the only game show that was set in Oahu, and was the only game show filmed entirely on location in Hawaii.  It was hosted by Bob Eubanks and the theme song was composed by Alan Thicke.  The location is obvious when watching it- because it was Hawaii- themed.

E) This "game show" was hosted by Rip Taylor.  It used a lot of the crew from "the Gong Show" and was a takeoff on beauty pageants.  The winner received a very small prize. She walked the runway as a winner, while Rip Taylor serenaded her in a takeoff of Bert Parks, then used a change-holder on his belt to dispense her winnings.  If you remember the show, you remember how much she won.

 

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Once again, name ANY to take the round.  They're all game shows.

 

A) This British game show is not about people giving technically correct answers.  It is far more concerned that the answers not be cliched (while being wrong)  and that the answers given be INTERESTING.  So, interesting trivia is worth points even if it did nothing to answer the question.   Cliches are punished with a foghorn/ klaxon-like sound while the monitors behind the players displays the cliche.   Returning players who are predictable while being wrong can lose points quite easily.  (My favorite example....One comedienne was fond of making jokes at her own expense.  "What was The Great Disappointment?"  Comedienne: "Have you been talking to my husband?"   *KLAXON*  *the sentence "Have you been talking to my husband?"  appeared on the monitors* ) Players are comedians, actors, and minor celebrities, occasionally including a PhD whose known in the UK. 

B) This British game show pits families against each other in attempts to answer more questions, and outscore all other families, to win a prize like a trip to the Kennedy Space Center. 

C) This US game show pit children against each other, answering incredibly difficult questions.  An eidetic memory was quite useful.  Neil Patrick Harris hosted this one.  Each episode had 2 teams of 3 kids pitted against each other, with the kids getting to name their team. 

D)  This US game show from decades ago was the only game show that was set in Oahu, and was the only game show filmed entirely on location in Hawaii.  It was hosted by Bob Eubanks and the theme song was composed by Alan Thicke.  The location is obvious when watching it- because it was Hawaii- themed.

E) This "game show" was hosted by Rip Taylor.  It used a lot of the crew from "the Gong Show" and was a takeoff on beauty pageants.  The winner received a very small prize. She walked the runway as a winner, while Rip Taylor serenaded her in a takeoff of Bert Parks, then used a change-holder on his belt to dispense her winnings.  If you remember the show, you remember how much she won.

 

F) This short-lived TV show was based on a party game.  The singer, Adam Wade, was the host- making him the first African-American game show host in the US.   A number of singers and singing groups appeared in this show's run.   When the singer stopped singing their song, a contestant had to ring in and identify the next line from the options offered.    The theme song was sung by the host. 

 

G) Celebrities were put on the spot with someone who was close to them, usually a Significant Other.   The audience was divided by color-  red, blue, or banana,  and rooted for one celebrity "couple" to win-  because that section would split the winnings.   The logo for the show contained an enormous letter "T". 

 

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Once again, name ANY to take the round.  They're all game shows.

 

A) This British game show is not about people giving technically correct answers.  It is far more concerned that the answers not be cliched (while being wrong)  and that the answers given be INTERESTING.  So, interesting trivia is worth points even if it did nothing to answer the question.   Cliches are punished with a foghorn/ klaxon-like sound while the monitors behind the players displays the cliche.   Returning players who are predictable while being wrong can lose points quite easily.  (My favorite example....One comedienne was fond of making jokes at her own expense.  "What was The Great Disappointment?"  Comedienne: "Have you been talking to my husband?"   *KLAXON*  *the sentence "Have you been talking to my husband?"  appeared on the monitors* ) Players are comedians, actors, and minor celebrities, occasionally including a PhD whose known in the UK. 

B) This British game show pits families against each other in attempts to answer more questions, and outscore all other families, to win a prize like a trip to the Kennedy Space Center. 

C) This US game show pit children against each other, answering incredibly difficult questions.  An eidetic memory was quite useful.  Neil Patrick Harris hosted this one.  Each episode had 2 teams of 3 kids pitted against each other, with the kids getting to name their team. 

D)  This US game show from decades ago was the only game show that was set in Oahu, and was the only game show filmed entirely on location in Hawaii.  It was hosted by Bob Eubanks and the theme song was composed by Alan Thicke.  The location is obvious when watching it- because it was Hawaii- themed.

E) This "game show" was hosted by Rip Taylor.  It used a lot of the crew from "the Gong Show" and was a takeoff on beauty pageants.  The winner received a very small prize. She walked the runway as a winner, while Rip Taylor serenaded her in a takeoff of Bert Parks, then used a change-holder on his belt to dispense her winnings.  If you remember the show, you remember how much she won.

 

F) This short-lived TV show was based on a party game.  The singer, Adam Wade, was the host- making him the first African-American game show host in the US.   A number of singers and singing groups appeared in this show's run.   When the singer stopped singing their song, a contestant had to ring in and identify the next line from the options offered.    The theme song was sung by the host. 

 

G) Celebrities were put on the spot with someone who was close to them, usually a Significant Other.   The audience was divided by color-  red, blue, or banana,  and rooted for one celebrity "couple" to win-  because that section would split the winnings.   The logo for the show contained an enormous letter "T". 


H)  This show had 2 hosts- Bill Anderson and Sarah Purcell.  It pitted 6 male contestants against 6 female contestants.    The US version aired from 1977 to 1978 originally. 

 

I) This show aired from 1969 to 1973 in its original run.  It had a number of international versions.   First Jack Kelly, then Joe Garagiola hosted this show.   It was a general knowledge show.  Players answered questions for points.  Periodically, an item was offered.  Players had the option of "buying" them (to keep no matter what)  in exchange for a certain amount removed from their score to  "pay for it."  About a decade ago, an attempt at a revival was made- but this show was called "Temptation."

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The sad thing is, I've probably seen a couple of these (not the British ones).  Tickling the back of my memory...

George

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Once again, name ANY to take the round.  They're all game shows.

 

A) This British game show is not about people giving technically correct answers.  It is far more concerned that the answers not be cliched (while being wrong)  and that the answers given be INTERESTING.  So, interesting trivia is worth points even if it did nothing to answer the question.   Cliches are punished with a foghorn/ klaxon-like sound while the monitors behind the players displays the cliche.   Returning players who are predictable while being wrong can lose points quite easily.  (My favorite example....One comedienne was fond of making jokes at her own expense.  "What was The Great Disappointment?"  Comedienne: "Have you been talking to my husband?"   *KLAXON*  *the sentence "Have you been talking to my husband?"  appeared on the monitors* ) Players are comedians, actors, and minor celebrities, occasionally including a PhD whose known in the UK. 

B) This British game show pits families against each other in attempts to answer more questions, and outscore all other families, to win a prize like a trip to the Kennedy Space Center. 

C) This US game show pit children against each other, answering incredibly difficult questions.  An eidetic memory was quite useful.  Neil Patrick Harris hosted this one.  Each episode had 2 teams of 3 kids pitted against each other, with the kids getting to name their team. 

D)  This US game show from decades ago was the only game show that was set in Oahu, and was the only game show filmed entirely on location in Hawaii.  It was hosted by Bob Eubanks and the theme song was composed by Alan Thicke.  The location is obvious when watching it- because it was Hawaii- themed.

E) This "game show" was hosted by Rip Taylor.  It used a lot of the crew from "the Gong Show" and was a takeoff on beauty pageants.  The winner received a very small prize. She walked the runway as a winner, while Rip Taylor serenaded her in a takeoff of Bert Parks, then used a change-holder on his belt to dispense her winnings.  If you remember the show, you remember how much she won.

 

F) This short-lived TV show was based on a party game.  The singer, Adam Wade, was the host- making him the first African-American game show host in the US.   A number of singers and singing groups appeared in this show's run.   When the singer stopped singing their song, a contestant had to ring in and identify the next line from the options offered.    The theme song was sung by the host. 

 

G) Celebrities were put on the spot with someone who was close to them, usually a Significant Other.   The audience was divided by color-  red, blue, or banana,  and rooted for one celebrity "couple" to win-  because that section would split the winnings.   The logo for the show contained an enormous letter "T". 


H)  This show had 2 hosts- Bill Anderson and Sarah Purcell.  It pitted 6 male contestants against 6 female contestants.    The US version aired from 1977 to 1978 originally. 

 

I) This show aired from 1969 to 1973 in its original run.  It had a number of international versions.   First Jack Kelly, then Joe Garagiola hosted this show.   It was a general knowledge show.  Players answered questions for points.  Periodically, an item was offered.  Players had the option of "buying" them (to keep no matter what)  in exchange for a certain amount removed from their score to  "pay for it."  About a decade ago, an attempt at a revival was made- but this show was called "Temptation."

 

J) The opening animation of this game show was accompanied by the following, with music in the background:  "Close Calls! Na-a-a-a-rrow Escapes!   Split-second Decisions!   And $25,000 in cash!    A combination guaranteed to make you say... "     The final season of this show included celebrities, which added the word "celebrity" to the title.  The show's infamous 'gauntlet of villains' was composed of-  Alphonse the Gangster,  Bruno the Headsman,  Mr. Van Louse the Landlord,  Nero the Fiddler,  Count Nibbleneck the Vampire,  Frank and his little friend Stein ,Kid Rotten the Gunslinger,  Jeremy Swash the Pirate, Dr. Deranged the Mad Scientist,  Lucretia the Witch. 

 

K) This show featured a panel of SIX celebrities, and contestants had to "capture" one based on whether or not they agreed or disagreed with the celebrity's answer.   Whenever I heard the title, I thought of a defunct SF TV show, and later, a minor Marvel superhero made me think of this then-defunct show.

L) This TV show featured contestants competing to outscore each other in an arcade game (different games each episode).  It was the first TV show to do so, but I'll accept as correct any of the copycat show names, instead (they're all pretty obscure.)

M)  This US show included 30 different packages.  A  contestant got to pick one.  The box was brought down, and the contents of the attached envelope (money)  were given to the contestant.  If they wished, they could trade that for whatever prize was 'in" the box.  Possibilities included a "klunk" (something worthless), a trip somewhere, a car, an appliance, and so on.    Upon their decision, the show went into a little skit, where the host took us on a little trip to revealing what was in the box (often leading to something worthless that in turn led to an actual good prize.)   If the Grand Prize was not selected,  then the end of the show included someone from security being brought in, confirming it was placed before the show began, then revealing which box held the $25,000 check.

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