Jump to content
GreaseSpot Cafe
WordWolf

Movie Mash-Up

Recommended Posts

Some prints of this movie omit the final line from a scene- one of my favorite lines from the movie- "Every one of them has a mother."

There's some prints that leave out part of the scene where 2 of the characters reach a boat.

What was Jack La Lanne doing in this movie?

Some of the characters have odd histories. One had a last name of "Beagle" before it was rewritten into the now-familiar last name (and middle names "Thaddeus Crane").  Another was visually based on the comic strip character "Broadway Bates." (With a middle name of "Chesterfield.")  Another has the middle name "Worthington." (None of the middle names appeared in the movie.)

 

It's not stated in the movie, but it's thought the bulk of the story took place in New Jersey.

 

The Spanish-language version of this movie included characters named Bruno Diaz and Ricardo Tapia

 

Someone parodied Nikita Krushchev's famous "bang the shoe at the UN" moment in this movie.

A Chrysler Imperial and a Lincoln Futura prototype both appear in this movie

A former Miss America appeared in the cast.

References to Robert Louis Stevenson's novels were snuck into the movie, but not into the dialogue.

This movie was NOT distributed by Warner Brothers (making it peculiar).

Once you've seen the scene where "Bringing in the Sheaves" is played, it's hard not to have the song stuck in your head whenever thinking about that scene.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Not getting this one, at all.  :asdf:

George

Picture "Bringing in the Sheaves." Now stop picturing it being SUNG and picture it being PLAYED.  Now picture the scene around it.  One line should spring to mind. What movie are you seeing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not stated in the movie, but it's thought the bulk of the story took place in New Jersey.

 

The Spanish-language version of this movie included characters named Bruno Diaz and Ricardo Tapia

 

Someone parodied Nikita Krushchev's famous "bang the shoe at the UN" moment in this movie.

A Chrysler Imperial and a Lincoln Futura prototype both appear in this movie

A former Miss America appeared in the cast.

References to Robert Louis Stevenson's novels were snuck into the movie, but not into the dialogue.

This movie was NOT distributed by Warner Brothers (making it peculiar).

Once you've seen the scene where "Bringing in the Sheaves" is played, it's hard not to have the song stuck in your head whenever thinking about that scene.

 

Characters in this movie include: President Lyndon B. Johnson,  Kitayna Ireyna Tatanya Kerenska Alisoff,   and bit characters named Bluebeard, Morgan and Quetch.

Reginald Denny played his last role in this film, as Commodore Schmidlapp.

Not many films include a motorcycle WITH a sidecar- but this is one of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's look at the clues George just solved.

It's not stated in the movie, but it's thought the bulk of the story took place in New Jersey.

Gotham City's believed to be in Jersey, and has appeared in maps as in Jersey.

 

The Spanish-language version of this movie included characters named Bruno Diaz and Ricardo Tapia

Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson were rendered with those names, for some reasons. Alfred was Alfred.

 

Someone parodied Nikita Krushchev's famous "bang the shoe at the UN" moment in this movie.

The fake UN scene.

 

A Chrysler Imperial and a Lincoln Futura prototype both appear in this movie.

Bruce Wayne's car and the Batmobile.

A former Miss America appeared in the cast.

Lee Meriwether as Catwoman.

References to Robert Louis Stevenson's novels were snuck into the movie, but not into the dialogue.

The name of the bar, the location of the kidnapping, was one book title. His next book was called "Kidnapped."

 

This movie was NOT distributed by Warner Brothers (making it peculiar).

It's the ONLY Batman movie Warner didn't distribute.

Once you've seen the scene where "Bringing in the Sheaves" is played, it's hard not to have the song stuck in your head whenever thinking about that scene.

That expy of the Salvation Army, while Batman ran around with the bomb.

 

Characters in this movie include: President Lyndon B. Johnson,  Kitayna Ireyna Tatanya Kerenska Alisoff,   and bit characters named Bluebeard, Morgan and Quetch.

Van Williams did the voice of LBJ.  Catwoman was disguised as "Ms Kitka."  Penguin's mooks had a pirate motif.

Reginald Denny played his last role in this film, as Commodore Schmidlapp.

He was kidnapped and Penguin impersonated him, IIRC.

Not many films include a motorcycle WITH a sidecar- but this is one of them.

Introducing the Batcycle- a motorcycle with a sidecar (for Robin.)  Later, in the TV show, Batman attached Alfred's bike to it, and was able to ferry "the Alf-cycle" to him when getting to the Bat-cycle.   BTW, in Argentina, the word for sidecar is "sidecar"- pronounced "sid-eh-cahr."  Same spelling, but nobody pronounced it to them, so they pronounced it as if it was written in Spanish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interestingly, it was the motorcycle with sidecar that gave it away.  (If it wasn't a Batman movie, it COULD have been one of the Frankie Avalon/Annette Funicello beach movies -- I think "Eric von Zipper" had such a conveyance.)

Then, the "Kitayna….Alisoff"/former Miss America became clear.  And the "Bluebeard, Morgan, and Quetch" names did have a Penguin-y feel to them.

I remember the  bomb scene, but forgot that one of the places Batman tried to toss the bomb had nuns (Salvation Army?) playing "Bringing in the Sheaves."

I vaguely remember the "bang the shoe" scene, which also helped confirm my guess.

Some stuff that WW didn't address:

Alfred was originally Alfred Beagle, getting the Pennyworth surname by the 1950s.  The "Broadway Bates" copy must be Penguin, whose full name is Oswald CHESTERFIELD Cobblepot.

The "Every one of them has a mother" line sounds typically Adam West-y when referring to villains.  ("Poor, deluded child" was used many times for female felons.)

I'm not sure about the boat reference, though the Bat-boat does appear.

I do not remember Jack  Lalanne in the film, at all.

George

Edited by GeorgeStGeorge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Interestingly, it was the motorcycle with sidecar that gave it away.  (If it wasn't a Batman movie, it COULD have been one of the Frankie Avalon/Annette Funicello beach movies -- I think "Eric von Zipper" had such a conveyance.)

Then, the "Kitayna….Alisoff"/former Miss America became clear.  And the "Bluebeard, Morgan, and Quetch" names did have a Penguin-y feel to them.

I remember the  bomb scene, but forgot that one of the places Batman tried to toss the bomb had nuns (Salvation Army?) playing "Bringing in the Sheaves."

I vaguely remember the "bang the shoe" scene, which also helped confirm my guess.

Some stuff that WW didn't address:

Alfred was originally Alfred Beagle, getting the Pennyworth surname by the 1950s.  The "Broadway Bates" copy must be Penguin, whose full name is Oswald CHESTERFIELD Cobblepot.

The "Every one of them has a mother" line sounds typically Adam West-y when referring to villains.  ("Poor, deluded child" was used many times for female felons.)

I'm not sure about the boat reference, though the Bat-boat does appear.

I do not remember Jack  Lalanne in the film, at all.

George

I didn't realize I had 2 sets of clues. Whoops.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/4/2019 at 2:40 AM, WordWolf said:

Some prints of this movie omit the final line from a scene- one of my favorite lines from the movie- "Every one of them has a mother."

There's some prints that leave out part of the scene where 2 of the characters reach a boat.

What was Jack La Lanne doing in this movie?

Some of the characters have odd histories. One had a last name of "Beagle" before it was rewritten into the now-familiar last name (and middle names "Thaddeus Crane").  Another was visually based on the comic strip character "Broadway Bates." (With a middle name of "Chesterfield.")  Another has the middle name "Worthington." (None of the middle names appeared in the movie.)   (snip)

The Penguin had a device that removed all the water from a person. He dehydrated his piratey henchmen, and CAREFULLY collected the powder. The scene ended while he said "Careful, careful- every one of them has a mother" while they collected all the powder.    The scene arriving at the dock for the Batboat is sometimes skipped.  La Lanne was on a roof with some women.  "Jack LaLanne has a cameo as a man on a rooftop with bikini-clad women."  (Nice work if you can get it, I suppose.)

Alfred Thaddeus Crane Pennyworth was once Alfred Beagle (and fat with no moustache.)  After Alan Napier took the role, he went on a diet and grew a moustache.  Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot was one of the villains ripped off of Dick Tracy.  http://dicktracy.wikia.com/wiki/Broadway_Bates

They had some fun in the comic strip with this, saying his brother Oswald worked out of a different town and that's where Bates was working for some time.  Bates returned, only to run afoul of a dark knight ("Cinnamon Knight")  and a colorful assistant ("Willa Scarlett").  Commissioner James WORTHINGTON Gordon looks nothing like the actor, however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The line "There's never been a terrorist attack on American soil" was included in trailers for the movie, but was left out of theatrical release because it sounded too much like an invitation or dare.

The attack on members of the Royal Family at the beginning of the film was inspired by a similar true-life attempt to kidnap Princess Anne on March 20, 1974. She was in her car when a man shot her guard and driver, then she was subsequently helped by a passerby who attacked the criminal and saved her.

The satellite attack-watching sequence features rather emotional, thinly scored music by James Horner, but the music is, in fact, taken quite directly from the slow movement of Dmitri Shostakovich's 5th Symphony. It's only for about half a minute that Horner does this, and he blends it into his own stuff, but that one little part is a very direct, uncredited grab.

George

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's something, but not a Kingsman movie.  It is a straight action film (not a "funny" action film like Kingsman).

The line "There's never been a terrorist attack on American soil" was included in trailers for the movie, but was left out of theatrical release because it sounded too much like an invitation or dare.

The attack on members of the Royal Family at the beginning of the film was inspired by a similar true-life attempt to kidnap Princess Anne on March 20, 1974. She was in her car when a man shot her guard and driver, then she was subsequently helped by a passerby who attacked the criminal and saved her.

The satellite attack-watching sequence features rather emotional, thinly scored music by James Horner, but the music is, in fact, taken quite directly from the slow movement of Dmitri Shostakovich's 5th Symphony. It's only for about half a minute that Horner does this, and he blends it into his own stuff, but that one little part is a very direct, uncredited grab.

In the film, the raid on the terrorist camp is carried out by the S.A.S. However, in the book, it is carried out by French special forces.

The name of Paddy O'Neil, the I.R.A. spokesman played by Richard Harris, is taken from the name used by the I.R.A. organization to sign all statements originating from them, P. O'Neil.

George

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This movie is based on a novel in which the main character dies, absolutely positively beyond a shadow of a doubt eliminating the possibility of sequels.

Kirk Douglas was originally to be part of the cast, but he was replaced when he objected to the new ending.

In the movie, the main character directly kills.... no one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, no, the title is not a misnomer at all. 

As far as the main character is concerned, the title refers to an act against HIM, not to his response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note: In the movie, the main character DIRECTLY kills no one.
A few people die BECAUSE of him, but that was after they needlessly beat him.

Actually, I'm not sure who really does draw first blood in the movie or the book. Metaphorically, it's the police, easily.

Edited by Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, next movie....

 

Michael Clarke Duncan         Temuera Morrison        Geoffrey Rush      Tim Robbins     Angela Bassett

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael Clarke Duncan         Temuera Morrison        Geoffrey Rush      Tim Robbins     Angela Bassett

-The main actor for the movie (arguably the title role)  clashed with the director, and was glad the movie performed poorly.

-Those looking for it in the movie can spot a bell, and tell you what note that bell sounds when rung. (Trivia fans.)

-The director wanted Bradley Cooper for the main actor, but he wasn't available.

- The main actress' line about cheekbones was an ad-lib.

An early version of the script included Pierce Brosnan making a brief appearance as Alan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...