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kimberly

Hi, all gardeners

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I have baby leaves in my first planter box.. Radishes, a couple of carrots and cabbage and spinach and a few baby onions peeking out.

They are too small for photos but expect some next weekend when they will be big enough for a full photo extravaganza.

Hopefully the second planter box will have erupted in leaves by then too.

I won't be planting any more of these boxes until perhaps mid march... and then another set in mid april and then one in every middle of the month thru June.

But Next weekend I am starting my pepper and tomato seedlings and a few flowers too for transplant as soon as it warms up a bit more.

I have to hold off until I get a plant light. I want one with a timer on it I think so I don't have to worry with my crazy school schedule this semester.

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Alright, Leafy, Ca-li-forn-eye-AAA, year round sunshine, heat wave and planter boxes! Stop making me jealous. XOXO's! Now that I am recently equipped with a digital camera (and as soon as I soak in all the info on the dvd that came with it) I am gonna shoot you some baby leaves as soon as I get them!!

Hot dang it. My plan for Wednesday was to put in the broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, early peas, spinach and lettuces . It had finally dried out enough. I woke up and it was pouring down rain. We even had 2 tornado watches. Not complain'in. Still loving on the much needed rain. I figure it will all come together. I think now it is too late for the early peas. No June peas for me. Yuccsshh, I don't like those big-fat-squishy-mushy-green peas.

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Kimberly, I just planted some pea seeds yesterday. I only like early peas too.

gc

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The ground finally dried enough for one day and I planted everything I mentioned before. I even planted the peas and made trellises (sp?) from branches and twine. That was a Friday. It started raining the next day. Hallelujah! Then it started snowing Sunday afternoon. Now we are gonna have snow peas!!! Hah, hah!

One week later to the day it was 75 degrees. For a week it was between 80 and 85 degrees. We slept with the windows open and pranced around in shorts. That was until yesterday. It is 50 degrees and we are freezing. But the "snow" peas are looking mighty green and healthy. Those precious little leaves are unfurled and reaching for the twine support their garden mama put up for them.

Of all the veggies, the red leaf lettuce has suffered the most from the snow. I think I may clip it back to the ground and see if it comes back up. I noticed yesterday green leaf lettuce I planted last fall and thought we used it all has started coming back up. It has been covered with mulch during the winter.

Happy gardening to all.

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You have me smiling while reading your post. I love the "garden mama" name!

We are still working on the building of our raised beds. Yesterday is was SUNNY! so we were able to pull up the concrete slab for the old washing line and the pole for the old washing line yea! Its sunny again today, which is wonderful, thank you God (two actual sunny days in a row), so we will get the ground leveled in one section and a retaining wall up for the second tier.

Thursday I planted a number of young lettuce seedlings into a new pot for them to grow on in. Later on when the veggie beds are ready I can put the rest of them in there. My brussels sprouts are looking healthy too.

I counted up my sweet pea plants, 45 annuals and 6 perennials!

May in July sometime we will get weather warm enough for me to wear shorts <_<

G

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Leafy, are those beautiful flowers (anemones?) from your garden? How about those baby leaves of radishes, cabbages, carrots and all? Come on let us know how they are doing.

WateredGarden, you are near the frozen tundra. So have you guys started things indoors?

gc, when you say washing line do you mean a clothes line? Or is it plumbing lines?

Hot dang girl, you tore up and removed concrete? That is some hard work. I won't ever challenge you to arm wrestle.

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HI everyone sorry for delays on posting pictures... we had a cold snap and so the veggies are still growing but slooooowly.

I put up a plastic cover and they are finally getting a good growth on. I will really post updated photos tomorrow.

right now today this evening... was the first day the air smelled like spring.

so I usually call this the first day of spring (I don't usually go by the calendar) You probably all know the smell it is a combination of warm air, first fruit tree blossoms and grass. and moist earth. it always seems to waft through the air like an illusive dream tickling your nostrils and pricking your brain into a happier mode. I smelled it at 8:30 PM tonight as I left my algebra class. and headed home.

It made me wish I had been out in the garden this evening.

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Leafy, are those beautiful flowers (anemones?) from your garden? How about those baby leaves of radishes, cabbages, carrots and all? Come on let us know how they are doing.

WateredGarden, you are near the frozen tundra. So have you guys started things indoors?

gc, when you say washing line do you mean a clothes line? Or is it plumbing lines?

Hot dang girl, you tore up and removed concrete? That is some hard work. I won't ever challenge you to arm wrestle.

Kimberly, I meant clothes line. I'm picking up more saying than I realize. A "clothes line" is a "washing line" here. Before you know it I'll be calling "the bathroom" the toilet! :)

The concrete was easier than I thought and a lot less work than the shoveling and sifting of the soil is (ongoing job). Its coming along nicely though.

leafy, we've actually had a warm front. I had my shoes off while I was working in the yard yesterday. For 4 days in a row the sun has been bright and I've not needed my fleece for the last two. I couldn't even tolerate a long sleeve tee yesterday, it has been wonderful and today is looking much the same. :)

gc

Edited by gc

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It's gonna rain and be in the 50s today; was probably close to 80 yesterday. But that's Ohio.

Mr. Garden planted Detroit dark red beet seed and peas over the weekend in one of our beds next to the patio that was formerly going to be the home of some hydrangeas. We've never been successful with beets but he is an optimist. He also plowed up some of the garden after working on the TroyBilt which has sprung a transmission leak.

We got in our little started trays last week and we have some seed to start in it. I have two big ceramic pots for the front porch and I'm thinking of starting cilantro in them; morning sun, afternoon shade sounds about right. Hopefully it won't bolt as quickly.

Spring!

WG

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WG I love planting from seed and when they start pushing through the soil, its just a delight! I've got a packet of beets, I've never grown them before.

gc

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LOL fro a second there I thought I lost this thread but I was just looking in the wrong places.

Okay

I got baby plant booty.

I was trying to decide wether to set it up as a slide show or as well just pictures so I set it up as just pictures less work becasue I have to go get some vegetables form my spanish report and presentation due on Tuesday

any way without further adu here are some lovelies.

100_1216.jpg

These are all the babies in their new greenhouse like contraption which has been on for a week and they really took off growth wias as soon as I put it on them.

100_1217.jpg

And some petite cabbages aren't they cute I cant wait to eat them!

100_1218.jpg Baby spinach up close an personal.. this is a nice spring variety and I do have a summer variety that I plant that doesn't bolt as bad in the heat.

100_1219.jpg

And the lovely carrots in between some radishes and some kind of lettuce greens. which I will be steaming and munching on shortly (The lettuce/greens that is)

100_1222.jpg

And last but not least the garlics which are doing amazing. and my mouth is watering just looking at them.

100_1204.jpg

Oh and in case you are wondering this is the new green house contraption thingy... I have to modify the next couple of them I make for one thing they will be with bird netting. and if you are wondering about the metal cage thing that is to keep chickens out the only problem being they are too short so the plants grow thru them and they are hard to get into without removing the whole cage and then I get help from the chickens thus the modified green house thingys.

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Leafy, you do have some beautiful lovelies and babies!!! You got it going on, girl!!!

Now about those chickens. I am so jealous. I want hens for laying. I can do that. But I also want to raise chickens for meat. My only problem is that I would make pets out of them and never be able to eat them. I have thought it would be grand to raise my own turkeys for meat. But I would make them my pets.

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Heya Leafy - don't know how much experience you have with growing garlic - but I have a fair bit. Every time you think they are REALLY REALLY ready - they are not! They require a long growing season to mature. The greens on top will be full long (months) before the bulbs are mature. But the wait is absolutely worth it.

100_1222.jpg

And last but not least the garlics which are doing amazing. and my mouth is watering just looking at them.

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Heya Leafy - don't know how much experience you have with growing garlic - but I have a fair bit. Every time you think they are REALLY REALLY ready - they are not! They require a long growing season to mature. The greens on top will be full long (months) before the bulbs are mature. But the wait is absolutely worth it.

This is my Third year growing the garlics.. The only way I can tell if they are done is to brush some soil away around the crown and check on size and the look of the paper skin. LOL but yes you are correct they take a long long time to grow. I am a bit worried about these as I got them in a bit late so they may be trying to bolt on me before they are ready to harvest. I am planing on throwing some hay over the tops as a mulch to help keep them cool once I get to May.

DO you use a plant calendar.. I have never been faithful enough to one to make them useful to me. I tend to pick when it looks ready to me.

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Leafy, you do have some beautiful lovelies and babies!!! You got it going on, girl!!!

Now about those chickens. I am so jealous. I want hens for laying. I can do that. But I also want to raise chickens for meat. My only problem is that I would make pets out of them and never be able to eat them. I have thought it would be grand to raise my own turkeys for meat. But I would make them my pets.

I am sadly not a got one to ask though I could give you exceptional directions on plucking.

I name them all. We had a turkey once and he was like having a really stupid dog around. but he was cute and funny... but really quite stupid. THe chicken are actually smarter than the turkey was.

I will say this laying hens do not make good eating hens. They have flavor. NOT really gamey like a duck but herbaly .. if that makes sense. and they are lean on meat compared to a hen you would get at the store.(Meaning Scrawny)

Also I can not bring myself to wring their necks.... (The naming thing I am sure)

IF I was starving Maybe. THE ones I plucked and ate were all killed by my dog. and I just happened to come home about 15 minutes after it happened. THis was years ago.

Any way if you do want hens you will want to get different kinds for laying versus eating

Good laying hens are Rhode Island reds. Black bared, Aracana Sometimes called americanas, and leghorns. I would also recomend buff orphingtons and astrolorphs.

For eating hens you need to get some RockX's THey are breed to be eaten and grow very rapidly. THey are fully grown to butcher and eat in about 4-6 monthes depending on how big you want your roaster.

Regarding the plucking it took three hens and by the third I could fully pluck it and gut it in 3 minutes. THe first took about 8 minutes, the second 5 and the third was considerably faster. There is a trick and a meithod to it. IT is not as messy as you would think.

But since my hens are all for laying I have never eaten any more. I would think after two or three you would like the flavor more than the store chickens.

edited for my attrocious spelling and for clarity ; )

Edited by leafytwiglet

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Just clip the tops of the greens - that'll hold them. If you throw hay on them check for snails on occasions - about halfway up the sides

I never use a plant calendar - I'm too used to the soil and the plants to trust a calendar...sorry if that sounds arrogant

I am a bit worried about these as I got them in a bit late so they may be trying to bolt on me before they are ready to harvest. I am planing on throwing some hay over the tops as a mulch to help keep them cool once I get to May.

DO you use a plant calendar.. I have never been faithful enough to one to make them useful to me. I tend to pick when it looks ready to me.

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Just clip the tops of the greens - that'll hold them. If you throw hay on them check for snails on occasions - about halfway up the sides

I never use a plant calendar - I'm too used to the soil and the plants to trust a calendar...sorry if that sounds arrogant

It sounds confident, not a bad place to be. So, since you are confident, maybe you can give me a bit of advice on something.

I'm growing garlic, and its my first attempt. I decided to grow some outside and some inside, don't ask me why. I have been know to do that with certain types of seeds to see what they can tolerate. But anyway, I'm going to move the garlic outside into one of my borders. Do you think I'll have problems with it and if so what type of. Thanks:)

gc

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I hate to sound amorphous to you gc but with garlic it really depends on the average climate where you live as well as soil type and drainage. Garlic tends to like a fairly wide range of soils, however too sandy or too much clay or hard packed earth is not going to give good results. They prefer moderate watering on a daily basis but in soil with good drainage - too little drainage and the bulbs will rot under ground...this applies to pretty much all edible plants whose "fruit" grows underground. In CA where I live there is a type of snail or slug that like hanging onto the cloves...oddly enough they don't eat the garlic - but kids get the yukkies if they see them hanging off a freshly pulled garlic plant. Garlics, essentially being bulbs, can be planted at your last frost. I usually sprout them in the kitchen until the first bit of leaf growth shows and then plant them - takes about 2-3 weeks in the kitchen.

Hope that helps.

It sounds confident, not a bad place to be. So, since you are confident, maybe you can give me a bit of advice on something.

I'm growing garlic, and its my first attempt. I decided to grow some outside and some inside, don't ask me why. I have been know to do that with certain types of seeds to see what they can tolerate. But anyway, I'm going to move the garlic outside into one of my borders. Do you think I'll have problems with it and if so what type of. Thanks:)

gc

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We live in the Rockies where the growing season is short. We plant our garlic in the fall and mulch it heavily. During early spring(which is pretty much winter weather here) we will water it during thaws, when the temps are in the forties. We get a really nice crop in late summer.

Moving here from the midwest, we heard all kinds of dire warnings about the difficulty of gardening here, but we have found it best it ignore most of that. We do have to start plants early in a home made greenhouse( mostly peppers, tomatoes and broccoli), and we mulch alot due to high winds and dry air, but we've been able to grow most things we love. We finally have asparagus established, and this year we are trying a big bed of quinoa. I'm also doing a three sisters hill, just for fun (corn, pole beans and squash planted in the same hill.)

We also have lots of tarps for those awful hail storms!

We've decided to take all the lawn out of our back yard and replace it with raised beds, fruit bushes(elderberry, chokecherry, gooseberry) and wild flowers. The lawn requires alot of water here, and all we do is mow it and look at it, the kids really don't play in the back yard now they can drive.The quinoa is supposed to look much like a wild flower patch so I'm excited about that.

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Oh you have to keep us updated on the quinoa. I would love to grow some.

The grain is a one of only two that has the complete aray of Amino acids. or something like that. NOt to mention if you are gluten sensitive you can eat it.

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We've decided to take all the lawn out of our back yard and replace it with raised beds, fruit bushes(elderberry, chokecherry, gooseberry) and wild flowers. The lawn requires alot of water here, and all we do is mow it and look at it, the kids really don't play in the back yard now they can drive.The quinoa is supposed to look much like a wild flower patch so I'm excited about that.

Right on! My kids are grown and I have no use for a lawn. As long as you are growing something might as well grow something(s) you can eat - besides a garden looks much nicer than a lawn.

Quinoa should do well in your area - it's origins go back to the high Andes in South Am. It grows well in soil with good drainage at up to 4000 meters in altitude. It is also high in proteins (for a plant) is not technically a grain, grass, or cereal. As noted above it is gluten free - and while it does not have a complete set of aminos it has a set that is very balanced for human consumption. Be aware that when you harvest the seeds they have a VERY VERY bitter hull that needs to be cracked off - you can get this done at your local health food store mechanically if you'd like. Every time I go to South Am I make sure to eat my fill of the stuff.

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I do have high hopes for the quinoa. We have sandy soil so drainage is NOT a problem and the backyard gets tons of sunshine. Hubby is diabetic and we've been buying it from the health food store to serve in place of rice since it does not elevate the blood sugar like white rice and cooks faster than brown rice. Sprouts nice for salads, too.

Edited by Bramble

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I do have high hopes for the quinoa. We have sandy soil so drainage is NOT a problem and the backyard gets tons of sunshine. Hubby is diabetic and we've been buying it from the health food store to serve in place of rice since it does not elevate the blood sugar like white rice and cooks faster than brown rice. Sprouts nice for salads, too.

OMG this is wonderful news for me I will besure to start subing it in when ever I can in place of rice. being prediabetic everything has to be considered when I eat it.

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Well, all I have is clay, clay, clay and more clay. That is why I amend, amend and have amended the soil over the years. Yet, with the glories of lime much has been grown in clay in our region. Amazing how nature becomes acclimated.

Leafy, we most assuredly are brethren. We are chicken lovers!!! I grew up wringing chickens necks. I have become such a softie I don't know if I could do it now. My grandparents raised chickens, pigs, corn and tobacco. Every Saturday afternoon I accompanied Grandpa to the chicken yard. Let me tell you this wasn't just a pen. It was nearly a quarter of an acre. And I might add the outhouse was in the back left corner. I visited the old place a couple of years ago. It was still as big as I imagined it.

And let me tell you folks, if you have never eaten fresh chicken and bacon or sausage.....you can't imagine. My grandparents raised it all on the feed they grew.....no additives except sage, salt and peppers. Folks back in that time knew how to grow, preserve, and live off the land. I am thankful I learned from them. Holy moly, the garden they grew that sustained them through the winter......the canning....I remember.

One of these days I am gonna have to write about the smoke house. Spooky place. Large carcasses hanging from the rafters.....We were forbidden to open the door. But being children we would sneak a peek and run away screaming.

Gosh, those were truly the good days. Did I mention the cellar under the tobacco house where the canning goods were stored?

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