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Another Charleston staple was stewed tomatoes and okra served over white rice. I never quite caught on to that, but I did make some passable Hoppin' John for New Year's day one time.

Substitute corn for okra if you are not an okra fan - perfectly fine dish.

The above from a post by WG and my brief response on the garden thread. Got me thinking about some corn recipes, tomato recipes, etc. So...I got to thinking about a great Louisiana recipe with corn and tomatoes called Maque Choux. Now Louisiana cooks will swear to you that every recipe for maque choux is different - you know - that home trade secret that all moms seem to have. Fact is that this basic recipe is easy and quite serviceable.

6 ears young corn or white corn

1 cup chopped onions

8 cloves chopped garlic

1/2 to 1 cup chopped bell peppers (according to taste)

1 cup chopped and seeded tomatoes (substituting canned tomatoes is fine)

1 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste)

1/2 tsp cayenne (or to taste)

1/2 cup milk

2 tsp oil (do not overdo the oil)

Cut the corn off the cob with a very sharp paring knife - slice across the tops of the kernels - scrape across to get the "milk" out of the corn, slice again

Heat oil over medium to medium high heat

Add onions, bell pepper, garlic and seasoning - cook for about 5 minutes until wilted

Add corn, cook another ten minutes

Add tomatoes and cook another 15-20 minutes stirring occasionaly until corn is tender

Add millk, stir and serve

Make four large servings, six regular servings.

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I Googled and found this recipe:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/17/dining/171crex.html?_r=1

Recipe: Chicken Purloo

Time: 2 hours

1 chicken, 4 to 5 pounds, cut into serving pieces

Kosher salt

3 tablespoons peanut oil

2 cups diced yellow onion

1 cup diced celery

2 tablespoons chopped garlic

1½ cups diced green bell pepper<

1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1/8 teaspoon dried basil

1/8 teaspoon dried thyme

2 bay leaves

1 cup skinned diced eggplant

2 cups long-grain white rice

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

½ cup diced tasso or other smoked ham

2 cups okra sliced 1/3 inch thick

¼ cup red wine

2½ cups canned whole peeled tomatoes, chopped

2 cups chicken stock or canned broth

Tabasco sauce, optional.

1. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Season chicken with salt to taste. Place 1 tablespoon oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, and brown chicken pieces. Transfer to a medium bowl, and set aside.

2. Add onion (and 1 teaspoon oil if necessary) to pan, and sauté until golden brown, about 6 minutes. Add celery (and 1 teaspoon oil if necessary), and cook until slightly softened, about 4 minutes. Add garlic, bell pepper, red pepper flakes, basil, thyme and bay leaves; sauté 2 minutes. Add eggplant (and 1 teaspoon oil if necessary), and sauté until eggplant is tender, about 4 minutes more. Transfer all vegetables and pan juices to a wide 3-to-4-quart ovenproof casserole dish, and spread them in an even layer.

3. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in sauté pan, and add rice. Sauté until rice is lightly golden, 2 to 3 minutes. Spread rice in an even layer over vegetables in casserole. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon salt and the pepper over rice.

4. Add 1 teaspoon oil to sauté pan. When hot, add ham, stirring until it is fragrant. Add okra, and sauté until lightly browned, 6 to 8 minutes. Add wine, and cook until pan is almost dry. Add tomatoes; simmer vigorously until mixture has thickened, about 6 minutes. In a small saucepan, bring stock to a boil, then remove from heat and set aside.

5. Layer okra and tomato mixture over rice in casserole. Arrange chicken pieces on top, placing thigh and leg portions near edge of pan and breast pieces in center. Top with any juices from bowl of chicken. Pour hot stock into casserole, and cover pan tightly with a lid or foil. Bake until rice has absorbed all liquid, about 1 hour.

6. Transfer chicken pieces to a platter. Toss rice and vegetables in pot, and season to taste with salt, pepper and Tabasco. On each of four plates, place a portion of chicken and a serving of rice and vegetables. Serve hot.

Yield: 4 servings.

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Here's a link to something I grew up eating on a weekly basis.

http://hubpages.com/hub/The_Greatest_Pasta_Sauce_Youve_Never_Tasted

Click on the link above for more information.

Genovese Sauce

- 3 lbs. (1.5 kg.) approx. of chuck, blade or other inexpensive beef or veal. Tie it into a roll if feasible.

- 10 lbs. (4.5 kg.) pounds medium yellow onions, finely sliced.

- 1 small-medium carrot, finely sliced.

- 1 small rib celery, finely chopped.

- 3 teaspoons salt.

- 4 rounded tablespoons finely cut parsley.

- 4 tablespoons bacon drippings (you can substitute this with canola or other vegetable oil).

- 4 tablespoons canola or other vegetable oil.

- 4 tablespoons Extra Virgin olive oil.

- 1 cup dry white wine (optional).

- 4 oz. (150 gr.) Parmigiano Reggiano.

- Freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Don't you dare throw it all in together at once! Another secret of Genovese is the timing of the ingredients. The process is simplicity itself, but mind the clock!

1) Get the biggest pot you have, but make sure that it has a nice thick bottom. Copper is best. Thin aluminum pots will burn the sauce. Pour the 4 tablespoons of canola or other vegetable oil into the pot, followed by all the onions. Cook at a medium heat and keep turning until all onions are beginning to become translucent.

2) In a cast-iron frying pan, heat up the bacon drippings until they're almost smoking. Now place the beef roll in the pan (watch for sizzling splatters) and turn it until it is forms a lovely light brown crust all the way around.

3) Remove the beef roll from the pan and place into the onion pot, covering the beef with onions and pouring the beef/bacon drippings into the pot. Deglaze with a little dry white wine if necessary. Turn to a medium-low simmer so that the juices from the beef and onions don't evaporate and leave the pot dry. Add a bit of water throughout the process if necessary. Now go to the beach, shopping, wash the car, whatever as you don't need to do much for another 6-8 hours. Just don't burn the sauce!

4) About one hour prior to dinner, remove the beef roll. Let it rest. Add the carrots and celery, give it a good stir, and leave it alone.

5) About 15 minutes prior to dinner, add the parsley (and wine if desired). Gently shred the beef roll, removing any obvious gristle that survived the cooking, and stir back into the sauce.

6) This is critical. About 3 minutes prior to serving, add all the salt and pepper. Give it a quick stir and then pour it over the plates of steaming pasta. Ziti and Penne are preferred, but this works with anything except spaghetti. Now grate enough Parmigiano to cover the sauce with a layer of cheese and pop under the broiler/salamander for a couple of minutes, just enough to melt the cheese.

And that's what makes Naples' Genovese sauce the best sauce you've never tasted!

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Pasta with Spinach and Basil (adapted from "The New Dieter's Cookbook" from BHG)

1/2 box spaghetti, fusilli, or linguini

2 tablespoons sour cream

1/2 cup cottage cheese

1/2 BAG fresh ready to eat baby spinach

1/2 cup fresh basil leaves

3-5 garlic cloves, depending on taste

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons or more freshly grated parm or Romano cheese

1/2 teaspoon salt

Cook pasta according to directions

Put all the other ingredients into a food processor and process until smooth. Drain pasta. Dump back into the warm pot you cooked the pasta in. Add the sauce and mix well. Serve hot and delicious.

I use at least 5 garlic cloves for this, and perhaps a tad more than 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves.

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For a moist turkey, especially if you just cook the breast:

1 gallon of water

1 cup of kosher salt

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar

Mix until salt and sugar are dissolved in the gallon of water and vinegar.

Add to a container that will hold mixture and turkey. Turkey should be covered by liquid mixture.

Soak for 24 hours. If container will not fit in refrigerator then add bags of ice or freeze packs.

After 24 hours remove the bird and place in roasting pan. Add enough chicken stock so that there is about 2 inches of liquid in pan.

Cook according to size of bird.

My turkeys are brined in a Coleman cooler. I save ice in freezer bags and add to cooler.

Roasting pan must be completely sealed when cooking turkey.

I never liked or could eat turkey white meat until I learned this method. It is the most moist and flavorful you will ever put in your mouth.

And, yes, don't forget to wash and sanitize that cooler if that is what you use.

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For a moist turkey, especially if you just cook the breast:

1 gallon of water

1 cup of kosher salt

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar

Mix until salt and sugar are dissolved in the gallon of water and vinegar.

Add to a container that will hold mixture and turkey. Turkey should be covered by liquid mixture.

Soak for 24 hours. If container will not fit in refrigerator then add bags of ice or freeze packs.

After 24 hours remove the bird and place in roasting pan. Add enough chicken stock so that there is about 2 inches of liquid in pan.

Cook according to size of bird.

My turkeys are brined in a Coleman cooler. I save ice in freezer bags and add to cooler.

Roasting pan must be completely sealed when cooking turkey.

I never liked or could eat turkey white meat until I learned this method. It is the most moist and flavorful you will ever put in your mouth.

And, yes, don't forget to wash and sanitize that cooler if that is what you use.

Thanks! I am just not a turkey person but I might just try this with some duck or goose.

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Rum, I was never a turkey person either until I tried this recipe. Mom always had to make sure she cooked a ham so I would have meat to eat at the holidays. This recipe really does change the flavor and texture of the turkey.

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bringing a precious thread to the top with a recipe that a dear friend sent me.

So this is the recipe I found: Mom did not put herbs in the pimento cheese, althoughI believe she did put a pinch of cayennepepper, but she always said you do not want your food so "hot" that one does not taste the earthy good food that isthe basis of the recipe.

Here is it - see below ~ oh yes the Magnolias (southern magnolia tree, smile)

Magnolias Southern Pimiento Cheese Appetizer

large red pimiento peppers, peeled, seeded and chopped,

or 2 1/2 cups jarred chopped red pimiento peppers, drained

1 cup finely chopped pimento-stuffed green olives

5 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese (optional)

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley (optional)

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Dash cayenne pepper, more if desired

Mix all of the ingredients (Mom did not have a food processor in that day and time) now it calls for a food processor to pulse the peppers while still leaving somewhat chunky.

Move the peppers to a large bowl and add the olives, cheddar and Parmesan cheeses, mayonnaise, parsley, black and cayenne peppers.

Mix until fully incorporated.

Season with additional cayenne pepper if desired. Serve with bread/toasted, or with crackers.

Makes 4 1/2 cups.

Love Martha

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