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This TVland-era syndicated show has aired in different countries.

When it aired (airs???) in Germany, the dubbing track has some added words.

To be specific, all the time, the characters apparently say

"The grass grows this high!"

A common saying at the time of the story was commonly ALTERED-

in Germany- and in English would have meant "medicinal herb",

which had absolutely no relevance to what the characters actually said.

(Why?)

Of the main characters of the show, one had previously been a bookkeeper

and the other the president of a toy company before the show and their

current "occupations."

2 characters once traveled to London, and several traveled to Paris.

The fake snow was sometimes white salt, but later it was all just white paint.

Nicknames for the "jolly jokers" included "Goldilocks", "Papa Bear", and

"Little Red Riding Hood", apparently all assigned arbitrarily because there seemed

to be no pattern to it.

"What is this man doing here????"

Actors who appeared during the series' run included Gavin Mac Leod,

William Christopher, Alice Ghostley, Hans Conried, Joe Tata, and

Harvey Keitel. Really.

 

This show actually released a music album, complete with the theme song AND ITS LYRICS. (It had lyrics???)   They had a set of trading cards, and a short-lived comic book series.  

Plans to make a movie of the series, so far, have not resulted in a theatrical film or solid plans to film one.      

One cast member was an African-American with an important role, who, among other things, came up with an ingenious use for a common coffeepot.   

One episode said the location was 60 miles/97 km)  from the North Sea.

The supposed "head bad guy" of the show has a spotless record, kept so by the good guys. (They cover their tracks VERY thoroughly.)

Richard Dawson was part of the principal cast.

The weather when filming was typical for Southern California (where they filmed), but the show had snow on the ground, all the time.

There was a lawsuit brought by the makers of a movie that shared a number of elements with the series. The jury found they were too similar, but a federal judge overruled them and said there was a "striking difference in the dramatic mood of the two works."

 

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I'm not clear what your point is then. I don't think I'm much older than anyone here. I thought the whole point of this game was to stir memories ,and realize-'oh yeah-I do remember that show !' I'm

it was Combat-on Tuesdays before McHales Navy on ABC.I don't have a fresh show handy at the moment, and off for the day. anyone may jump in.

I'm glad someone else had heard of it. He could have dropped the name and I still wouldn't have gotten close.

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13 hours ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Hogan's Heroes?

George

YES!

 

When the script called for "seig heil" or something, they changed the phrase in German so it was the name of an herb that was pronounced almost the same way.     The salute with the hand forward and up was coupled with "The grass grows this high!"   Colonel Klink has never had a prisoner escape, He always has exactly the same number of prisoners, and they seem to be the same prisoners as near as anyone can tell.   

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Match the Star Trek captain (Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Janeway, and Archer with his or her place of birth,

Bloomington, IN

upstate New York (but grew up in San Francisco)

Iowa

New Orleans, LA

La Barre, France

For extra credit, say whether the character had ever been married. (not required to win the round)

George

 

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On 2/14/2021 at 9:39 AM, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Match the Star Trek captain (Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Janeway, and Archer with his or her place of birth,

Bloomington, IN

upstate New York (but grew up in San Francisco)

Iowa

New Orleans, LA

La Barre, France

For extra credit, say whether the character had ever been married. (not required to win the round)

George

 

Bump.

George

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Match the Star Trek captain (Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Janeway, and Archer with his or her place of birth,

Bloomington, IN

upstate New York (but grew up in San Francisco)

Iowa

New Orleans, LA

La Barre, France

For extra credit, say whether the character had ever been married. (not required to win the round)

At least three of these should be pretty easy.  If you get the other two backwards, I'll give it to you.

George

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I find it amazing that I'm not even getting guesses, here.  So, here's the lineup:

Kirk:  "I'm from Iowa.  I just WORK in outer space."

Picard:  France. DUHH

Sisko:  A large portion of the last couple of seasons took place in New Orleans (his dad's restaurant).

Janeway:  Bloomington

Archer:  NY-SF.

FREE POST!!

George

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On 3/3/2021 at 8:16 AM, GeorgeStGeorge said:

I find it amazing that I'm not even getting guesses, here.  So, here's the lineup:

Kirk:  "I'm from Iowa.  I just WORK in outer space."

Picard:  France. DUHH

Sisko:  A large portion of the last couple of seasons took place in New Orleans (his dad's restaurant).

Janeway:  Bloomington

Archer:  NY-SF.

I forgot.  Kirk and Sisko are widowers.  Kirk married Miramanee while suffering amnesia on another planet.  She was killed while pregnant with his child.  Sisko's wife Jennifer was killed at Wolf 359.  Janeway had a fiancé but was not married.  I know Picard never married.  I believe Archer was unmarried, as well.

George

STILL FREE POST

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This show was based on actual events on the West Coast immediately after the Civil War.

A young Bruce Lee appeared as a Chinese immigrant named Lin in the episode "Marriage Chinese Style" (1969). This character was the only dramatic English language non-martial arts role in Lee's acting career.

Cicely Tyson, Jane Wyatt, Edward Asner, Majel Barrett (Star Trek), Barry Williams (pre-The Brady Bunch), Marge Redmond and Madeleine Sherwood (both known as regulars in The Flying Nun), Bernard Fox (Dr. Bombay of Bewitched), Vic Tayback, Lynda Day George, Bob Cummings, Daniel J. Travanti and James B. Sikking (both later known for Hill Street Blues), Larry Linville (M*A*S*H) and Billy Mumy (Lost in Space) all made guest appearances.

George

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No.

This show was based on actual events on the West Coast immediately after the Civil War.

A young Bruce Lee appeared as a Chinese immigrant named Lin in the episode "Marriage Chinese Style" (1969). This character was the only dramatic English language non-martial arts role in Lee's acting career.

Cicely Tyson, Jane Wyatt, Edward Asner, Majel Barrett (Star Trek), Barry Williams (pre-The Brady Bunch), Marge Redmond and Madeleine Sherwood (both known as regulars in The Flying Nun), Bernard Fox (Dr. Bombay of Bewitched), Vic Tayback, Lynda Day George, Bob Cummings, Daniel J. Travanti and James B. Sikking (both later known for Hill Street Blues), Larry Linville (M*A*S*H) and Billy Mumy (Lost in Space) all made guest appearances.

Two of the stars immediately became teen heartthrobs.  (They were in their early 20s at the time.)

This show ran for three years (1968-1970), pretty much starting as Star Trek ended.  An actor with two minor roles in Star Trek played a major character in this show.

George

Edited by GeorgeStGeorge
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I don't think Gunsmoke was set on the west coast.  Let's try a minor modification:

This show was based on actual events in the Pacific Northwest immediately after the Civil War.

A young Bruce Lee appeared as a Chinese immigrant named Lin in the episode "Marriage Chinese Style" (1969). This character was the only dramatic English language non-martial arts role in Lee's acting career.

Cicely Tyson, Jane Wyatt, Edward Asner, Majel Barrett (Star Trek), Barry Williams (pre-The Brady Bunch), Marge Redmond and Madeleine Sherwood (both known as regulars in The Flying Nun), Bernard Fox (Dr. Bombay of Bewitched), Vic Tayback, Lynda Day George, Bob Cummings, Daniel J. Travanti and James B. Sikking (both later known for Hill Street Blues), Larry Linville (M*A*S*H) and Billy Mumy (Lost in Space) all made guest appearances.

Two of the stars immediately became teen heartthrobs.  (They were in their early 20s at the time.)

This show ran for three years (1968-1970), pretty much starting as Star Trek ended.  An actor with two minor roles in Star Trek played a major character in this show.

George

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4 hours ago, Human without the bean said:

In Seattle.  I'm not sure if that is the name but Bobbie Sherman had a hit song about Seattle.

I'll give it to you.  The show was "Here Come the Brides,"  inspired by events in the life of Asa Mercer, first president of the Territorial University of Washington, Washington State Senator, and resident of Seattle. Mercer made three 19th-century ocean voyages that sailed to New England to recruit eligible women to move to the Pacific Northwest, where there was an extreme imbalance in the ratio of men to women. Due to teh war, the women greatly outnumbered the men in New England.

Bobby Sherman and David Soul were the heartthrobs.

Mark Lenard, who played Sarek and a Romulan commander on Star Trek, was Aaron Stemple, the Bolts' rival and nemesis.  An interesting note from IMDb:

According to the 1985 "Star Trek" novel "Ishmael" by Barbara Hambly, Aaron Stempel (spelled Stemple in the novel) is an ancestor of Amanda Grayson, Spock's mother. In the novel, Spock prevented the Klingons from assassinating Stempel and altering history. This is an intertextual in-joke as Stempel was played by Mark Lenard, who also played Spock's father Ambassador Sarek beginning in Star Trek: The Original Series: Journey to Babel (1967).

George

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This show became notorious for airing reruns when new episodes were not completed in time for broadcast.  The mid 80's comedy-drama was considered one of the first successful examples of the emerging distinct genre "dramedy".  The male and female lead did not get along during production.  However, both actors were notoriously difficult to work with.  The delays became so great that even the studio mockingly made an ad showing executives waiting impatiently for the next new episodes to arrive at the network headquarters.

 

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