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Lilly Aspell performed all the required physical stunt work herself at the age of 12, because it was deemed that she did the job better than her own stunt doubles.

The star of this film, a sequel, made 33 times what she made on the first film.

George

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Why didn't you say that 2 days ago Mr. Wolf? Your right Rottie, They are pretty good. Makes it tough on me to get my 2 cents in.

I was way off going with "The Terminal", except that it didn't have any articles of clothing in the title. I assume WordWolf is correct, but I'm not familiar with it. But that's not unusual.

Stallone. Also well-known for reprising his Rocky role. I can't see him in Eddie Murphy's role in BHC, though... George

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Since you asked so nicely,

Lilly Aspell performed all the required physical stunt work herself at the age of 12, because it was deemed that she did the job better than her own stunt doubles.

The star of this film, a sequel, made 33 times what she made on the first film.

The film has had seven release dates, the first being December 20th, 2019. Then it was moved up to November 8th, 2019 in order to avoid competing against Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker (2019). Once it was announced that the 25th James Bond film was to leave its originally scheduled November 1st spot, Warner Bros. moved the film's release up another week, in order to take an extra week advantage. The fourth was when it was pushed back by 7 months to June 5th, 2020 as Warner Bros. realized the success of the first film's June release. The fifth change was made on March 24th, 2020 when it was moved to August 14, 2020 due to concerns about the COVID-19 virus. It was again moved to Oct. 2 in June when Warner Brothers shifted its entire schedule of upcoming films. Then in September 2020, it was pushed once more to December 25th, 2020 and released on streaming at the same time.

George

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[Chuckles]  No.

Lilly Aspell (not the star, but who had a significant part) performed all the required physical stunt work herself at the age of 12, because it was deemed that she did the job better than her own stunt doubles.

The star of this film, a sequel, made 33 times what she made on the first film.

The film has had seven release dates, the first being December 20th, 2019. Then it was moved up to November 8th, 2019 in order to avoid competing against Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker (2019). Once it was announced that the 25th James Bond film was to leave its originally scheduled November 1st spot, Warner Bros. moved the film's release up another week, in order to take an extra week advantage. The fourth was when it was pushed back by 7 months to June 5th, 2020 as Warner Bros. realized the success of the first film's June release. The fifth change was made on March 24th, 2020 when it was moved to August 14, 2020 due to concerns about the COVID-19 virus. It was again moved to Oct. 2 in June when Warner Brothers shifted its entire schedule of upcoming films. Then in September 2020, it was pushed once more to December 25th, 2020 and released on streaming at the same time.

This film takes place in a certain year, but there are anachronistic errors throughout.  (Mostly, items or places which came into being after the movie year.)

This movie takes place 66 years after the first one.

George

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Close enough.  Wonder Woman '84.

Lily Aspell plays young Diana on Paradise Island.

Obviously, you haven't seen it.  It introduces a number of themes from the WW comic book:  invisible plane, flying by "riding the wind currents," etc.  It was hard to describe without involving obvious references to Greek mythology, etc.

Mild spoiler alert:  Lynda Carter has a cute cameo.

George

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-There's a title that's shared by 2 movies-which is fair since they're 2 different versions of the same story. -None of the endings of the story were incredibly happy. However, in the original, one of the main characters survives, and in the 2nd, 2 of them do (but their future looks endangered.)  The 2nd one had an ending that was trashed and never made it past the test audiences-  everybody died, and the Earth was invaded, quite successfully (complete with the theater audience among the casualties, with a 4th wall break.) 

-Many people forget (or don't know) there was an original version, which was a black-and-white. In that one (made on a shoestring budget of about $30,000 US), they used a clip of a full moon as a cutaway to bridge 2 scenes that didn't link properly.  20 years later, they were shocked to read an 8-page magazine article about the significance of the  moon in that movie.

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-There's a title that's shared by 2 movies-which is fair since they're 2 different versions of the same story. -None of the endings of the story were incredibly happy. However, in the original, one of the main characters survives, and in the 2nd, 2 of them do (but their future looks endangered.)  The 2nd one had an ending that was trashed and never made it past the test audiences-  everybody died, and the Earth was invaded, quite successfully (complete with the theater audience among the casualties, with a 4th wall break.) 

-Many people forget (or don't know) there was an original version, which was a black-and-white. In that one (made on a shoestring budget of about $30,000 US), they used a clip of a full moon as a cutaway to bridge 2 scenes that didn't link properly.  20 years later, they were shocked to read an 8-page magazine article about the significance of the  moon in that movie.

-The 80s version had a budget of $25 million US, but was filmed in England. 

-The original version was filmed over 2 days on an existing set. It is currently in the public domain.

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5 hours ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

I was thinking "The Day the Earth Stood Still," but that remake was done early 2000s.

George

Yeah, that's not this movie, but you knew that.

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-There's a title that's shared by 2 movies-which is fair since they're 2 different versions of the same story. -None of the endings of the story were incredibly happy. However, in the original, one of the main characters survives, and in the 2nd, 2 of them do (but their future looks endangered.)  The 2nd one had an ending that was trashed and never made it past the test audiences-  everybody died, and the Earth was invaded, quite successfully (complete with the theater audience among the casualties, with a 4th wall break.) 

-Many people forget (or don't know) there was an original version, which was a black-and-white. In that one (made on a shoestring budget of about $30,000 US), they used a clip of a full moon as a cutaway to bridge 2 scenes that didn't link properly.  20 years later, they were shocked to read an 8-page magazine article about the significance of the  moon in that movie.

-The 80s version had a budget of $25 million US, but was filmed in England. 

-The original version was filmed over 2 days on an existing set. It is currently in the public domain.

-The original version was directed by Roger Corman, the other version by Frank Oz.

- In the 80s version, Brian Henson and Heather Henson are in the movie, but only Heather actually appears on camera. (They're Jim Henson's kids.)  Brian is one of several people to play one of the roles of the film.

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12 hours ago, WordWolf said:

-There's a title that's shared by 2 movies-which is fair since they're 2 different versions of the same story. -None of the endings of the story were incredibly happy. However, in the original, one of the main characters survives, and in the 2nd, 2 of them do (but their future looks endangered.)  The 2nd one had an ending that was trashed and never made it past the test audiences-  everybody died, and the Earth was invaded, quite successfully (complete with the theater audience among the casualties, with a 4th wall break.) 

-Many people forget (or don't know) there was an original version, which was a black-and-white. In that one (made on a shoestring budget of about $30,000 US), they used a clip of a full moon as a cutaway to bridge 2 scenes that didn't link properly.  20 years later, they were shocked to read an 8-page magazine article about the significance of the  moon in that movie.

-The 80s version had a budget of $25 million US, but was filmed in England. 

-The original version was filmed over 2 days on an existing set. It is currently in the public domain.

-The original version was directed by Roger Corman, the other version by Frank Oz.

- In the 80s version, Brian Henson and Heather Henson are in the movie, but only Heather actually appears on camera. (They're Jim Henson's kids.)  Brian is one of several people to play one of the roles of the film.

The 80s version was filmed at Elstree Studios.  Corman thought so little about the original that he never bothered to copyright it- so it's always been in the public domain.    Brian Henson was one of several puppeteers to play "Audrey II."

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This 1960's movie begins with an Overture (a still saying "Overture" is shown while the music plays) followed by the cast list, then a dedication to "Mr. Laurel and Mr. Hardy."  Halfway through the movie is an Intermission, including a musical "Entr'acte" (with appropriate still).

The two male stars had previously starred in a comedy, playing co-workers, of a sort.  In this film, also a comedy, they play rivals. Each film also had a (different) female star.

George

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This 1960's movie begins with an Overture (a still saying "Overture" is shown while the music plays) followed by the cast list, then a dedication to "Mr. Laurel and Mr. Hardy."  Halfway through the movie is an Intermission, including a musical "Entr'acte" (with appropriate still).

The two male stars had previously starred in a comedy, playing co-workers, of a sort.  In this film, also a comedy, they play rivals. Each film also had a (different) female star.

A Saturday morning cartoon was inspired by this movie.

One of the male stars plays two roles.  One character impersonates the other, briefly.

Although dedicated to Laurel and Hardy, the pie fight near the end was classic Stooges.

George

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