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kimberly

What's For Dinner

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Hey, what you guys cooking/eating for Thanksgiving dinner?

The big fat hen is cooked as well as the giblets. The pecan and apple pies are made. Dressing is prepped and ready for the oven. All I have to do tomorrow morn is make the mac and cheese pie, giblet gravy and cranberry relish. There will be greenbeans and butterbeans from the garden. This is the first Thanksgiving meal I can remember not having collards. There has yet to be a frost. Frost makes the collards sweeter.

My dressing recipe is from my yankee mom. We don't make cornbread dressing as most southerners do. It is made from white and wheat bread.

The bread slices (2 loaves of white and 1/2 loaf whole wheat) are placed on the oven racks and dried with the temp on warm.

Remove from oven when dried. Allow to cool.

Crumble slices with your hands. The pieces should be small.

In 2 sticks of butter, 1/4 cup olive oil, and 2 cups of chicken stock cook 3 stalks of celery small-chopped and one large onion small-chopped.

When celery and onion is al dente add a dozen minced sage leaves. Simmer 2 minutes longer.

Add this to bread. Mix very well so all bread is coated with butter etc. Then add 6 medium-chopped boiled eggs and 2 cups of small-chopped giblets. We prefer just the chicken gizzards, though some like to add the livers, also.

Add milk to make mixture wet, not mushy. Mix together so all milk is soaked into bread. When mixture is squeezed in hand it should hold together somewhat and no milk squishing through fingers. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix very well. Let sit for half an hour then taste again. Adjust with seasonings. Maybe need to add some dry sage? We like to be able to taste the hint of sage.

To this add 3 or 4 raw beaten eggs. Note: This is why you salt and pepper and adjust seasonings to taste before this stage. Now this mixture should hold together real well when lightly squeezed in your hand. It should be quite moist and realitively squishy. You DO NOT want a dry mixture.

Place in baking dish that is no more than 3 inches in height. Bake, covered, 325 for 45 minutes. Or remove before dressing becomes hard. It should still be lightly squishy to the touch when removed from the oven as it will cook for a little longer in the dish when removed from the oven.

This dressing is literally cut into squares. And served with giblet gravy on top. Yum, Yum, Yummy!!!

I never measure anything unless it is pastries and desserts. All else is by sight and taste.

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Well since my S/O is working today and all children are respectively with other parents - ain't doin' nuthin for TNX meal....however if you want our XMAS menu here it is....

XMAS Menu 2009.doc

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We have a couple of vegetarians with us this year so I made a big dish of sliced polenta with a pesto, walnut, and red pepper topping. The rest of the meal is quite traditional. By "traditional", I mean that I wasn't involved in cooking it .

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Rum, you are having Etouffee...and your address is.?.?....

Waysider, to me, pesto is like bacon...everything tastes good with it.

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Rum, you are having Etouffee...and your address is.?.?....

I work at LSU - so take a guess - and yeah been cooking etouffee for almost 30 years now...among other things.

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Well, I cooked a turkey again, as per usual. But I'm damned if I know why. The kids are all elsewhere, I don't HAVE a S/O, and I can't eat anything anymore (type II B.S.). So I just put the whole turkey, with all the trimmings right from the oven and into the fridge, where it'll stay probably until it turns green.

Stupid...

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I didnt have time to go home to the family this year. I have too much traveling has to be done in a short time.

I went to the annual community "Thanksgiving Dinner that cant be beat" at Arlo Guthries place here in town from Alices Restaurant fame.

Local chefs, good ones too donate their time so it was pretty amazing. All the normal traditional stuff plus all sorts of fancy woop de doo things where they all tried to outdo each other. The music was great too.

Way too much food--- Someone needs to roll me around in a wheelbarrow today

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Went to friends' house this year, brought two bottles of very nice wine and two home baked pies - my first lemon meringue from scratch. Pretty good if I do say so

WG

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George, you could slice that turkey and freeze it in parts. That way you could eat from it for a while...sandwiches, pot pie, soup, etc.

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George Type II B.S. Does not preclude Turkey LOL Just the stuffing and the pumpkin Pie... except in very small quantities... too small to be enjoyable in my opinion!

Sending you hugs because I understand your frustration!

We had the usual but Hubby's family has been getting one of those prepared dinners from the supermarket that you just heat up.. The good thing about it is that it has all real potatoes and gourmet green beans and a nice stuffing.

I having the same problem as George... So I had the turkey... a little dollop of white potatoes and a larger dollop of sweet potatoes(they did not have marshmallows on them but an orange juice sauce instead) and lots of green beans. I skipped the stuffing and the rolls but I splurged on a small piece of pumpkin pie Minus the pie crust.. it was still quite yummy! Oh and I did have a handful of raw carrots from the relish tray.

All in all a most satisfying dinner. Although i miss the stuffing.

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RumRunner, I'm joining Kimberley beating your door down to share your meals....!

Are you providing personal wheel kits so's people can haul their bellies around, after that enormous week of feasting? :biglaugh:

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RumRunner, I'm joining Kimberley beating your door down to share your meals....!

Are you providing personal wheel kits so's people can haul their bellies around, after that enormous week of feasting? :biglaugh:

Heh - would be glad to share recipes on here. Nothing really fancy on the menu - just good cooking....BUT BUT - no wheel kits (or wheel barrows as called in the USA) - if you eat to much you are welcome to crash on the floor whilst I listen the the Grateful Dead and prepare the next meal

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Alrighty, Rum, we know you are busy with your company but you have to update us on those fabulous fixins....

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Alrighty, Rum, we know you are busy with your company but you have to update us on those fabulous fixins....

All went perfectly, including the Yorkshire pudding which can be picky. Today we'll have brisket with potato pancakes, tomato salad topped with lobster.

And by all means, share those recipes..yeh, yeh, yeh

Indeed I will. Tomorrow most guests leave so I'll post some recipes. To be honest, I use a lot of basic Prudhomme or Lagazzi recipes - sometimes merge them - almost always modify them so suit my taste. Roast, brisket, etc are family recipes.

Suffice it to say there was more food than even my son can tackle...and he can eat.

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Rum,

Didn't we take Christmas (or Thanksgiving) meal together in Keene that year? Would have been '75. It was at the home of a fine New England lady. I remember the Yorkshire pudding, which I viewed with a mixture of interest & horror.

We had, among other things, BBQ turkey yesterday. Here's my recipe:

This is a nice alternative to traditional roast turkey, which I associate with dry, bland and stringy breast meat. It has the added bonus of freeing oven space for those other dishes you need to prepare for a holiday feast.

1 turkey

1 pint of fresh Creole seasoning vegetables (such as Guidry’s Fresh Cuts, found in the produce section).

1 lb andouille sausage, diced.

1 bottle of Jack Miller’s or similar BBQ sauce. Stubb’s original is acceptable, but do not use a dark caramel sauce like KC Masterpiece. The flavor definitely clashes with turkey.

1 small can of frozen limeade concentrate.

Prepare by cutting the turkey in half bilaterally. This will require a heavy sharp knife, strength and patience. Poultry shears will help in some places.

Sauté seasoning vegetables and sausage until the onions are clarified.

Make deep cuts in the thighs and breast meats and stuff with sauté mix. Also stuff the mix under the skin wherever possible. Reserve the remaining sauté mix.

Wrap each half with 4 layers of wide heavy-duty Reynolds foil (other brands won’t hold up to the fire). Place on grill, bone side down, for about 2 hours on a medium fire. Be careful when placing them on the grill that you don’t tear the foil.

Combine the reserved sauté mix with BBQ sauce and limeade concentrate. After two hours of cooking, turn each half (now meat side down), make a small opening on the sides now facing up, and pour in BBQ sauce-limeade-sauté mix. Reserve the remainder to serve tableside. Close up the slits. Cook for about one hour.

The turkey will not need much carving as it will have fallen to bits by now. Place the undignified mess on a platter as is, or if you’d like to get fancy you can separate the meats from the bone and arrange nicely on a serving piece. Either way, enjoy.

In retrospect, test with a thermometer. Those times could have been reduced about 25%

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Rum,

Didn't we take Christmas (or Thanksgiving) meal together in Keene that year? Would have been '75. It was at the home of a fine New England lady. I remember the Yorkshire pudding, which I viewed with a mixture of interest & horror.

Aye we did indeed as I recall - although recall at my age going back that far is certainly subject to question.

Thanks for posting the recipe!

D

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