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Rocky

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Posts posted by Rocky

  1. 13 minutes ago, Robinette Byden said:

    First off, if you're trying to get someone to settle their differences with somebody else, shouldn't you try to get them to confront their demons, face-to-face?

    Do you really assume/surmise that telling the stories people tell on GSC are about "trying to get someone to settle their differences with someone else?

    Why might you have a hard time grasping that telling one's story or stories is about anything other than telling one's stories?

  2. 5 hours ago, Robinette Byden said:

    I think I can sum up my views of the main arguments here with this thread in two small paragraphs:

    1)  Whether you consider "the official turning point of the Way Ministry" 35 years ago (Weirwille's passing), or 20 years ago (Martindale's termination), that's just too long of a time to hold a grudge against somebody. That type of bitterness goes along the same plateau as, the Hatfields vs. the McCoys, or Israel vs. the Arabs. You need a heck a lot more than just changing your name to a pseudonym and spewing out vulgarities over the Internet to ever be delivered from that degree of hatred.

    2)  Identifying "wolves in sheep's clothing" is really a very small part of what Christianity and the Bible are all about. It certainly doesn't supersede Compassion and Forgiveness. If that's supposed to be the whole objective behind GreaseSpotCafe.com , maybe it's high time some of you 'Old Farts' get your heads together and modify that objective a little bit.

    Just sayin

    Btw, it appears you've not had any significant contact in your life with journalists or historians. Of course, I could be wrong. However, journalists and historians tell the stories of what has happened.

    Humans are ALL about STORIES. 

    What has been your experience with stories?

    Are you still IN twi? Just askin' ...

     

  3. 5 hours ago, Robinette Byden said:

    I think I can sum up my views of the main arguments here with this thread in two small paragraphs:

    1)  Whether you consider "the official turning point of the Way Ministry" 35 years ago (Wierwille's passing), or 20 years ago (Martindale's termination), that's just too long of a time to hold a grudge against somebody. That type of bitterness goes along the same plateau as, the Hatfields vs. the McCoys, or Israel vs. the Arabs. You need a heck a lot more than just changing your name to a pseudonym and spewing out vulgarities over the Internet to ever be delivered from that degree of hatred.

    2)  Identifying "wolves in sheep's clothing" is really a very small part of what Christianity and the Bible are all about. It certainly doesn't supersede Compassion and Forgiveness. If that's supposed to be the whole objective behind GreaseSpotCafe.com , maybe it's high time some of you 'Old Farts' get your heads together and modify that objective a little bit.

    Just sayin

    Your empathy seems to be deficient. Your apparent need to pass judgment on people who post here more than makes up for it. :spy:   :beer:

  4. 1 hour ago, Robinette Byden said:

    Granted, I'm sure there are a few stories out there of folks who really got BLEEPED (emotionally, spiritually, and sometimes even physically) by Way Ministry leadership. Some people in the USA have had some rough times going through Divorces, but they got over it. Some Holacaust survivors have had a hard time after escaping Nazi Concentration camps, but they got over it.

    To paraphrase Paul the Apostle, sometimes you just need to "shake off the dust and move on."

    For clarification, are you suggesting you know better what any person other than yourself is specifically responsible to do with her/his life, specifically?

    Your comments read like you are condemning GSC and the people who continue to contribute here long after leaving TWI. Is that what you intended?

    World population is now estimated by the United Nations to be 7.8 billion people. That could be quite a burden of oversight if that's what you're thinking.

  5. 2 hours ago, WordWolf said:

    I didn't get offended at the scene with Jesus in "History of the World Part I",  so I'm ok with this.  I hardly equate either with a credible position, but neither has to be.  Something funny or interesting can be good because it is funny or interesting, not because it's historically accurate. 

    Though there is some humor in Ms. Kidd's book, that's not the thrust. It's really about the protagonist, Ana, a young woman wanting to find her voice in the world at that time.

     

  6. 1 hour ago, Twinky said:

    Hard to have "meticulous research" when we don't know anything...!

    Meticulous anthropological and cultural research .  To write a compelling novel about the subject, she would have to have deep and extensive background knowledge about the era and the cultural geography.

    Frankly, I find the story quite compelling. Kidd isn't proselytizing for or against Christianity. But she did imagine Jesus's humanity in greater depth and detail probably than anyone else in our contemporary times.

    Even if Jesus was/is both God and man, how much does anyone, even JW's or wayfers actually imagine his interaction with people except on the surface?

    That, anyway, is why I find the book fascinating.

    It's out there for people -- who might be interested -- to read.

    The author treats Jesus and his family (sibs/parents) with reverence. 

    I first became aware of the book when I saw a friend put it on a list of what she wanted to read. I made a mental note to look out for if/when she wrote a review in the event she actually read it.

    She did, on goodreads.com, and gave it five stars. So I read some reviews and requested it from my local public library. I picked it up on Friday.  

    Thanks, Twinky, for posing the question. :wave:

  7. Since Jesus Christ is not God, and since we don't know anything about his life entailed during his 20s, what do you think about the recent story by Sue Monk Kidd, The Book of Longings?

    Here's what Amazon's page for selling the book says about it,

    In her mesmerizing fourth work of fiction, Sue Monk Kidd takes an audacious approach to history and brings her acclaimed narrative gifts to imagine the story of a young woman named Ana. Raised in a wealthy family with ties to the ruler of Galilee, she is rebellious and ambitious, with a brilliant mind and a daring spirit. She engages in furtive scholarly pursuits and writes narratives about neglected and silenced women. Ana is expected to marry an older widower, a prospect that horrifies her. An encounter with eighteen-year-old Jesus changes everything.

    Their marriage evolves with love and conflict, humor and pathos in Nazareth, where Ana makes a home with Jesus, his brothers, and their mother, Mary. Ana's pent-up longings intensify amid the turbulent resistance to Rome's occupation of Israel, partially led by her brother, Judas. She is sustained by her fearless aunt Yaltha, who harbors a compelling secret. When Ana commits a brazen act that puts her in peril, she flees to Alexandria, where startling revelations and greater dangers unfold, and she finds refuge in unexpected surroundings. Ana determines her fate during a stunning convergence of events considered among the most impactful in human history.

    Grounded in meticulous research and written with a reverential approach to Jesus's life that focuses on his humanity, The Book of Longings is an inspiring, unforgettable account of one woman's bold struggle to realize the passion and potential inside her, while living in a time, place and culture devised to silence her. It is a triumph of storytelling both timely and timeless, from a masterful writer at the height of her powers.

    Here's also a youtube discussion with the author,

     


    I've got a copy of the Large Print edition from my local public library and have read the first 40-some pages of it so far. I find The Book of Longings fascinating.

  8. 12 hours ago, Raf said:

    Trying to figure out how we went from "Paulette is a hurricane and here's the track and it will be a tropical storm through Sunday" to "Nevermind, it's gone" in about 12 hours. Sheesh.

    Looks like it was the old "extratropical transition" trick... missed it by... that much.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Paulette

    Paulette developed from a tropical wave on September 7. Due to relatively favorable conditions, Paulette gradually strengthened into a strong tropical storm, though an increase in wind shear caused it to weaken. Wind shear continued to increase to the south of the system, but despite the shear, Paulette unexpectedly strengthened back into a strong tropical storm on September 11, with deep convection located just north of the center. A dry air inclusion caused the cyclone's structure to become disheveled on September 12, though Paulette quickly recovered and strengthened into a hurricane at 03:00 UTC on September 13. Paulette then developed a closed eyewall and a clear eye as it steadily strengthened and moved towards Bermuda. Early on September 14th, Paulette made landfall in northeastern Bermuda as a Category 1 hurricane while making a sharp turn to the north. It then further strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane as it moved away from the island, reaching its peak intensity on September 14 with of 105 mph (165 km/h) winds and a pressure of 965 mbar (28.50 inHg). On the evening of September 15, it began to weaken and undergo extratropical transition, which it completed on September 16.

  9. 5 hours ago, Raf said:

    Ok, so just when I thought I wasn't going to worry about Paulette anymore, here's her forecast cone.

    WTAF.

    If it keeps heading south it could conceivably make another westward turn and threaten the US coast again. It could also sprout wings and zip over Africa on its way to Australia. What do I know. My point is, it's not dead yet.

    image.png

    Just to the east of that cone (Fri night to Sat night) sits the Azores Islands. Some 45 years ago or so, I endured a few hurricanes... with horizontal rain and one storm wherein we got 8 inches of rain in two hours in early October one year. I was there for about three years. I hope this storm dissipates soon and doesn't damage anything in the Azores.

  10. 1 hour ago, socks said:

    So - I finished re reading the book, Mr Rocky and figure to close the loop on this discussion.
     

    I can't think of anything Bell says logically or scripturally that makes me want to adopt his position, to be honest. Saying that, I think the emotion, the charis, of his message is closer to the truth than the hell and damnation stuff. As I understand and teach salvation, "hell" isn't really a topic. Jesus did talk about it but not in a way that I think me spreading His message now, needs to deeply consider. In the big context, it's another topic. 

    Jesus Christ revealed God to mankind, gave the pneuma of God a visage, form, in which His intents could be seen, known, considered and even understood. 

    Jesus Christ functioned in a very small corner of the world and the lessons and teachings of His life are better understood in a small community, familial context where a group (He and His disciples) exist within a larger familial style group (Jews) that function in an extended community spread over an area (land, geography, distribution of population) and that all are rooted in the same customs and culture while having their own twists and turns on them as the community border grows and spreads over time...and all of which exists in another different and separate social governmental community that exercises a degree of control over them (Rome and Roman rule and occupation).

    In that context when Jesus said that seeing Him was like seeing the Father - He made an incredibly powerful point that was impossible to miss by those who were with Him.  Jesus forgave, offered mercy and forgiveness, grace. He healed and restored people to health. He wouldn't have done so if it were not what God willed. And He did that in a very small intimate context. 

    Although we live in a time of global awareness I am not of the mind that the Christian message is best understood that way. The "body of Christ" is a very large community of course but it won't be fully congregated until the future and then into it's much larger context. We need to be aware of the larger church community of which we are a part and to which we can have an impact, but our direct part in it is immediate. I think some of today's conflicts in the church come from the desire of members to see themselves on too large a level, where pastors try to teach the entire world, apostles try to speak for the destiny of the entire church, teachers want to reach vast congregations of listeners. The real work of the church that most closely resembles what Christ DID ON EARTH is local, personal, intimate and real. His greater purpose was of course, infinitely vast. Selah, as they say. 

    That's about it for me, just tying up loose ends. Peace n love! 

    Thank you very much, Socks, for sharing your insight. Indeed, I see the human nature of Christian pastors/teachers wanting to reach the entire world. And that's how I view it, as human nature. But your point about the intimate nature of Jesus' work is wonderful. 

    Hopefully many more Christians will have their eyes opened up to that insight.


    Peace n love back at you. Selah. 

  11. On 8/30/2020 at 1:23 AM, Utopian/Lunch said:

    I'm new here. My grandmother was going through a tough time in the late 80s and found some Wayers/Ex-Wayers (idk). She say the VPW vids and later the WIGP tapes and through the CG networks in CA met a lot of people. My mom followed suit and somehow i have also. Despite what i have now come to believe as the sensible members of my family not going along. I dropped out of it when i got into college and have serious theological qualms, but i'm not here to debate or preach anything. I just want to meet other people who where a part of this really weird  thing in my life that was confusing and made relating to others in a religious way darn near impossible. 

    You want to meet people in person who can relate to your experience? Are you in California?

  12. 41 minutes ago, WordWolf said:

    That's "Provocations" by Soren Kierkegaard.

    Yes, that's it. Thanks WW. 

    Here's a related reference from Goodreads:

    "This is all I have known for certain, that God is love. Even if I have been mistaken on this of that point, God is nevertheless love. If I have made a mistake it will be plain enough; so I repent- and God is love. He is love, not he has love, nor, he will be love, oh no, even that future was too slow for me, he is love. Oh, how wonderful. Sometimes, perhaps my repentance does not come at once, and so there is a future. But God keeps no person waiting, he is love. Like spring-water which keeps the same temperature summer and winter- so is God's love. His love is a spring that never runs dry."

    And a related book, Love Matters More: How Fighting to be Right keeps us from Loving like Jesus.

  13. The only time I ever recall hearing anything about this theologian/philosopher was on the game show Jeopardy.

    I found a review on Goodreads of Provocations: Spiritual writings of Kierkegaard that stirred me.

    Soren Kierkegaard's radical idea: what would happen if someone were to introduce Christianity to.... Christians?

    He doesn't actually state it as such but that is the essential thrust of the writings collected in this volume. His work is an antidote to a factory assembly line version of Christianity; a reminder that spirituality is not outwardly conforming to a certain manner of life (ritual) or inwardly acquiescing to a certain set of intellectual propositions (theology) but is instead a lived out experience (faith).

    "There are many people who reach their conclusions about life like schoolboys; they cheat their master by copying the answer out of a book without having worked out the sum for themselves." - Soren Kierkegaard

    The title for this collection was very aptly chosen. I have a friend who once shared with me that she takes a certain amount of pleasure in poking egos with a stick. I'm going to commandeer her phrase because it is such a perfect description of what this book does - it pokes the ego with a stick.

    “Face the facts of being what you are, for that is what changes what you are.” - Søren Kierkegaard

    Another reviewer stated it far more pithily than me: the purpose is to inform in order to transform.

    *****

    It occurs to me (Rocky) that Wierwille was one of those people described above who cheat their master by copying the answer out of a book without having worked it out for himself... even though VPW made plenty of claims to the contrary.

    If you've studied any Kierkegaard writings, please share your impressions of his ideas.

    Thanks

     

     

  14. 8 hours ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

    Houston's not quite out of the woods, but I don't expect major impact here.  Newscasters are noting that the storm surge could be a problem (from Laura); but I'm too far inland for that to get me.  Galveston's sea wall should also absorb most of the brunt for that city.  Smaller coastal towns (Freeport, etc.) might have a rough day.

    George

    I hope damage is minimal in Houston. Good luck, George.

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