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Here, I'll make it easy. 

The lead actor played one of the authors of the book on which the movie was based.

He's in the movie for 3:21:58.

So what kind of book was it?

And why did the OTHER author have to write the ending?

 

 

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The director drew the ire of some educators [and the praise of others] by suggesting people skip school to watch this movie in theaters.

[As someone who went on a class trip to see "The Wiz," I should say this would have been a worthwhile unauthorized field trip].

The movie opens with footage of the beating of Rodney King by four Los Angeles police officers, which, aside from a broad theme, has nothing to do with the events of this film, which took place decades earlier.

 

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On 11/8/2021 at 10:53 AM, Raf said:

Here, I'll make it easy. 

The lead actor played one of the authors of the book on which the movie was based.

He's in the movie for 3:21:58.

So what kind of book was it?

And why did the OTHER author have to write the ending?

 

 

Presumably, the book is an autobiography.  When the author died, another had to tell about it.

If it weren't for the Rodney King mention, I'd have been thinking Moses/Joshua.  It might have made sense with filming in Mecca.  But that's clearly not this movie.

George

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  Ok, so it's a movie about someone who wrote an autobiography with the cooperation of another author who had to finish it when he died.

Now...

To whom is Mecca important? What person fitting that category is known to have written an autobiography? 

James Baldwin contributed significantly to the screenplay. His area of social expertise intersects with the "who thinks Mecca is important" element. Cross reference the two topics and three people emerge as likely candidates. Only one had a movie about him significant enough to be included on this thread.

Oh, there was nothing obscure about this movie.

And, as a joke, you did NOT have to watch nine movies before this to get up to speed. It is neither sequel nor prequel.

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I tried to hint: the events of this movie take place three or four decades before Rodney King.

That puts Lawrence of Arabia at... WAY TOO SOON.

The lead actor would go on to win Best Actor for a less iconic role. Funny, he lost Best Actor for THIS movie to another actor for a less iconic role than the one that really defined his career.

THAT Actor should have won the Oscar that went to Art Carney.

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I can figure out just about everything except the answer.  :rolleyes:

Art Carney won for Harry and Tonto, and there was a lot of grumbling that Al Pacino didn't win for Godfather II.  Pacino DID win for Scent of a Woman, but I don't remember any other Oscars from around that time.

If anyone else is playing, think really long autobiographical movie, involving the Middle East, from the early 90s.

George

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Mecca might be throwing you off. It takes up only a few minutes of screen time.

There's also a glaring thematic omission in your summary that you should have picked up on by now. It matters.

The co-author of the book on which the movie is based is far more famous for writing another book that, years earlier, was adapted into one of the most acclaimed miniseries of all time.

One particularly well-known scene was parodied, hilariously, by Dave Chapelle in a movie that was COMPLETELY unrelated.

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The majority of the movie takes place in the USA.

Mecca is just a place visited by the main character, as required.

It is NOT a sequel. You do not need to watch parts I-IX to understand what's going on.

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9 minutes ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

:doh:  Malcolm X (?)  :biglaugh:

George

That must be it.  However, if Denzel Washington was to go on and win Best Actor for a less iconic role, either Raf has a different definition of iconic than I do, or he just means he won it for a character like Al Pacino's "Scent of a Woman" playing Col. Frank Slade but, in this case, Denzel was playing a dark seedy character, Alonzo Harris, in "Training Day".  I can set that.  Denzel is famous for his hero roles.  "Man on Fire", "The Book of Eli", "Crimson Tide", and ridding the world of evil doers.  Either way, it is probably the right guess.   I've been following the post I just couldn't wrap my head around anything yet.

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Yea, keep doing that face palm thing there, buddy.

I was gonna play the race card on this one, but decided that would do more harm than good. :)

Denzel lost to Al Pacino Hooah!

Spike Lee and the movie were not. even. nominated.

James Baldwin wrote a draft of the screenplay, based on the Autobiography of Malcolm X, as told to Alex Haley, author of Roots.

It's Malcolm X, not Malcolm Part 10. You don't need to watch the first nine. 

Dave Chapelle parodies the "hoodwinked, bamboozled, Plymouth Rock" speech, substituting Sherwood Forest, in Robin Hood, Men in Tights.

Had I said ANYTHING about this being Black-centric, you'd have guessed it in 4.2 seconds. But Baldwin was known as a pre-eminent voice in Black America. I thought his name would be clue enough. Intersect it with Mecca being important to Muslims, and you have Black Muslims. If you didn't guess Malcolm X from THAT, you're playing the wrong game. Name that Tune from the Title is a few threads down.

Denzel Washington, snubbed for Malcolm X, lost to Al Pacino but went on to win Best Actor for Training Day.

Al Pacino, snubbed for Godfather II, lost to Art Carney, but went on to win Best Actor for Scent of a Woman.

Spike Lee really did suggest kids skip school to watch his movie. It was self serving advice, but not bad advice, to be honest.

 

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And yeah, I would say Denzel Washington's performance as Malcolm X was more iconic than whoever he played in Training Day. Not saying he did a bad job. I think an argument can be made that if Washington had won for Malcolm X 10 years earlier, Will Smith would have won the award for his performance in Ali.

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9 hours ago, Raf said:

Yea, keep doing that face palm thing there, buddy.

I was gonna play the race card on this one, but decided that would do more harm than good. :)

Don't follow, but I never did.

Edited by Human without the bean
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A playful dig about an older white guy's inability to recall a major movie centered on a Black main character and cast could have come off as funny or accusatory. 

So I chose not to go there. 

I did say in one of the clues we were overlooking a major theme, followed by "It matters." Too subtle? 

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Movies longer than three hours tend to be serious dramas (biographies like Gandhi and Malcom X or epic tales like Ben-Hur or Lord of the Rings).  This one is quite different.

Stan Laurel was offered a cameo role but refused, as he had promised never to work again after the death of Oliver Hardy.  The role went to Jack Benny.

At the time this film was made, there were about 100 stunt performers in America.  80 of them were used in this film.

George

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  • 2 weeks later...

Movies longer than three hours tend to be serious dramas (biographies like Gandhi and Malcom X or epic tales like Ben-Hur or Lord of the Rings).  This one is quite different.

Stan Laurel was offered a cameo role but refused, as he had promised never to work again after the death of Oliver Hardy.  The role went to Jack Benny.

At the time this film was made, there were about 100 stunt performers in America.  80 of them were used in this film.

The film was so crammed with action that each leading actor was given two scripts: one for the dialogue and one for physical comedy.

For the intermission of the premiere engagement at the Cinerama Dome in Hollywood, the filmmakers recorded messages supposedly sent over police radios describing what was happening to various characters. These messages were played not only in the auditorium during the intermission but at the concession stand and even in the bathrooms.

The diector asked Buster Keaton to perform one of his signature bits, moving two steps forward then one back before racing away from whatever was threatening him. Even in his 60s the comedian was as spry as he had been in his prime.

George

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