Jump to content
GreaseSpot Cafe

Strong enough to be (God forbid) WRONG?!


Rocky
 Share

Recommended Posts

Joshua Eugene Harris is an American author and former pastor. Harris' 1997 book I Kissed Dating Goodbye, in which he laid out his ideas concerning a Biblically-based Christian approach to dating and relationships, helped shape purity culture for many Christian millennials.[1] Harris was lead pastor of Covenant Life Church, the founding church of Sovereign Grace Ministries, in Gaithersburg, Maryland from 2004 until 2015. In 2018, Harris disavowed I Kissed Dating Goodbye and discontinued its publication. The following year, Harris announced that he was separating from his wife, had "undergone a massive shift in regard to my faith in Jesus" and was not a Christian. 

Edited by Rocky
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What If You Weren’t Such a Know It All?

You’re smart. You went to college. You’ve read lots of books. You’ve seen a thing or two.

So you know a lot. When people have questions, you’ve got answers. When stuff happens, you’ve got opinions. When there are problems, you’ve got solutions. 

This is great, right? Maybe. 

Epictetus reminds us that “it’s impossible to learn that which you think you already know.” To the Stoics, particularly Zeno, conceitedness was the primary impediment to wisdom. Because when you’ve always got answers, opinions and ready-made solutions, what you’re not doing is learning. What you’re not doing is looking at things objectively, clearly, with fresh eyes. You’re just relying on instinct and preconceived notions. 

Ego is the enemy for a reason. It blinds us. It distracts us. It puffs us up and prevents us from learning. The less of a know it all we are, the more we can actually get out and discover. The more open we’ll be. The wiser we’ll become.

Remember, the key to Socrates’ philosophy was his admission of ignorance. It was his desire to ask questions, his willingness to be proven wrong, his interest in having conversations—with anyone about anything. He was smart because he was humble, not conceited because he was smart. 

This is a skill we have to practice. We have to prevent ego from cutting us off from wisdom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good TedX talk.

Nothing wrong with changing one's mind, one's opinions, if more information comes along that causes another look at one's thinking.

I'm thinking of Copernicus, Galileo (piggybacked onto Copernicus's theory) (= the Earth revolved round the sun, not the sun round Earth): Martin Luther (how the church had got "grace" all wrong); Einstein (theory of relativity; couldn't reconcile old paradigms); and there are many others.  St Paul, if you like.  Our world, our lives as we now know them, would be radically different if these men had not been able to change their minds. 

Do you know "plate tectonics" as an idea has only been accepted since mid- to late 1960s?  But who would argue with that now?  (And yet, that theory may still be wrong, but we won't know till more evidence comes to light).  What about medical advances?  Who these days would want to tie a dead mouse to their cheek to alleviate toothache?  And who would want a surgeon who did not wash hands before operations?

Okay, we're not all geniuses, and we may never come up with amazing new ideas like any of these.  

But being willing to accept we were wrong - could change our families, our communities.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Twinky said:

Good TedX talk.

Nothing wrong with changing one's mind, one's opinions, if more information comes along that causes another look at one's thinking.

I'm thinking of Copernicus, Galileo (piggybacked onto Copernicus's theory) (= the Earth revolved round the sun, not the sun round Earth): Martin Luther (how the church had got "grace" all wrong); Einstein (theory of relativity; couldn't reconcile old paradigms); and there are many others.  St Paul, if you like.  Our world, our lives as we now know them, would be radically different if these men had not been able to change their minds. 

Do you know "plate tectonics" as an idea has only been accepted since mid- to late 1960s?  But who would argue with that now?  (And yet, that theory may still be wrong [IMO, more likely than wrong, possibly incomplete, but you're very correct], but we won't know till more evidence comes to light).  What about medical advances?  Who these days would want to tie a dead mouse to their cheek to alleviate toothache?  And who would want a surgeon who did not wash hands before operations?

Okay, we're not all geniuses, and we may never come up with amazing new ideas like any of these.  

But being willing to accept we were wrong - could change our families, our communities.

One of the books I'm reading now is The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life. One of the new (new to me anyway) ideas in the book is that not only does our DNA change generation to generation because we get genes from each of our parents, but our DNA changes as a result of environmental influences, one of which could be viral infections. The author tells a compelling story. One of the figures he describes is French evolutionist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, a "a soldier from a family of soldiering minor nobility who transformed himself into a botanist, then into a professor of zoology at the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris..." David Quammen described Lamarck as a protean figure. [protean: extremely variable ; changeable in shape or form, as an amoeba ; a versatile actor]

 

Edited by Rocky
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think we'd say that Lamarck was "reinventing himself" in today's parlance, Rocky.  But I don't think that means his DNA would change markedly.

I found this quite interesting academic paper about genetics and familial recombination of genetic material:

Understanding genetic changes between generations | PNAS

That's what Darwin's theory of evolution was about: how environment can change species.  He worked that out by watching tortoises in the Galapagos Islands: tortoises that ate plants near the ground had rounded shells and shorter necks. Tortoises on islands with tall shrubs had longer necks and shells that bent upward, allowing them to stretch their necks.  Survival of the most adaptable!!  In human beings: skin colour, flare of nostrils.  Even alcohol tolerance: some Asians lack the enzyme that metabolises alcohol and thus have a lower alcohol tolerance than Europeans.

I am not, however, convinced that one's genes prevent one from changing one's mind.  Is stubbornness learned, or inherited?  Is adaptability and receptivity to new ideas learned, or inherited?

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love Harris noting all evolution involves death….those that are not strong are destined to die. Thrown aside with no second thought. The conquerors do not look back and feel sorry for those they have crushed. 
That is how we must look at change in our personal lives;  our past beliefs must die if we are to realize change. As in real life, death of an old idea is very hard to overcome. Past beliefs do not want to go away without a fight. They will hang on in the back of our minds until we make the decision to crush them. Then our transformation is complete, and we can move ahead and challenge our next evolution. 
Change is difficult, but important to our growth. 
 

Edited by Stayed Too Long
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Stayed Too Long said:

. . . Then our transformation is complete, and we can move ahead and challenge our next evolution. 
Change is difficult, but important to our growth. 
 

No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.
Heraclitus
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Stayed Too Long said:

Anyone know how to delete the blank jpeg image that is above?

I guess you’ve tried editing it out- does it not show a blank space when you go into edit mode?

if it takes forever when you’re trying to save an edit - you might want to clear all cookies and history from your browser - - Grease Spot website is real picky about that - it hangs me up a lot if I’ve done a lot of browsing 

Edited by T-Bone
More info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...