Jump to content
GreaseSpot Cafe

Movie Mash-Up


Recommended Posts

On 7/13/2022 at 3:18 PM, modcat5 said:

Does the avenger of the future have a complete memory of it?

On 7/14/2022 at 2:01 PM, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Maybe we'll get lucky, and Human will give the answer.

George

On 7/14/2022 at 6:36 AM, modcat5 said:

I'll give the answer if George promises to take the turn

On 7/14/2022 at 2:00 PM, GeorgeStGeorge said:

I'll give the answer if Raf promises to take the turn.   :biglaugh:

George

Sorry I missed all that.  For some reason I didn't look at this thread. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Principal photography had been completed in October, 1951, but the amount of coverage shot by George Stevens resulted in such an extremely protracted editing process that the film wasn't released until August, 1953. All this drove up the costs of what should have been a simple, straightforward Western; in fact, they spiraled so much that Paramount approached Howard Hughes about taking on the property, but he declined. He changed his mind when he saw a rough cut and offered to buy the film on the spot. This made Paramount rethink its strategy--originally it was going to release it as a "B" picture but then decided it should be one of the studio's flagship films of the year. This proved to be a good decision, as the film was a major success and easily recouped its inflated budget.

Does the hero die at the end?  One of my friends says definitely.  But that thought had never even occurred to me.

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Principal photography had been completed in October, 1951, but the amount of coverage shot by George Stevens resulted in such an extremely protracted editing process that the film wasn't released until August, 1953. All this drove up the costs of what should have been a simple, straightforward Western; in fact, they spiraled so much that Paramount approached Howard Hughes about taking on the property, but he declined. He changed his mind when he saw a rough cut and offered to buy the film on the spot. This made Paramount rethink its strategy--originally it was going to release it as a "B" picture but then decided it should be one of the studio's flagship films of the year. This proved to be a good decision, as the film was a major success and easily recouped its inflated budget.

Does the hero die at the end?  One of my friends says definitely.  But that thought had never even occurred to me.

The Batman TV show had a character parodying the title character of this movie.  That seems to be what Raf (and maybe WW) are hinting at.

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

This movie could TECHNICALLY be described as an exploration of the path to stardom, with glimpses of the drawbacks on the way there.

One character abruptly abandons the lead at a phone-call from their agent, another expresses the loneliness of the road and having to leave home behind, and the lead must continually face the prospect of selling out rather than following his dream of making millions of people happy.  

Supposedly, it was "sort-of approximately" how events happened, as if it was a dramatization of real historical events.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This movie could TECHNICALLY be described as an exploration of the path to stardom, with glimpses of the drawbacks on the way there.

One character abruptly abandons the lead at a phone-call from their agent, another expresses the loneliness of the road and having to leave home behind, and the lead must continually face the prospect of selling out rather than following his dream of making millions of people happy.  

Supposedly, it was "sort-of approximately" how events happened, as if it was a dramatization of real historical events.

This movie had an impressive number of cameo appearances by celebrities, in addition to those who appeared more than briefly.  One cameo was by Paul Williams, who came up with several songs for the soundtrack, including the most-recognized song from the movie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, GeorgeStGeorge said:

Sounds like a Muppets movie, but I wouldn't know which one.  The Muppets Take Manhattan?

George

Correct!  "The Muppet Movie" was the correct answer, which you said, more or less.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A remake of this 1960s movie was made in the late 1990s.  Only one cast member appears in both films.

In the dance party scene, where the layer cake falls off the beak of the totem pole and drops onto Miss Inch's face, writer and director David Swift originally wanted to cut the shot of the cake-fall. But when producer Walt Disney saw the rushes, he told Swift to leave the shot in, saying it would be the biggest laugh in the movie. Turns out, Walt was right.

In the shot where "Mitch Evers" trips on the chair, he fell so hard, he cracked a rib, and kept right on with the scene. The actor was a true professional.

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A remake of this 1960s movie was made in the late 1990s.  Only three of the original cast lived long enough to see the remake.  One cast member appears in both films.

In the dance party scene, where the layer cake falls off the beak of the totem pole and drops onto Miss Inch's face, writer and director David Swift originally wanted to cut the shot of the cake-fall. But when producer Walt Disney saw the rushes, he told Swift to leave the shot in, saying it would be the biggest laugh in the movie. Turns out, Walt was right.

In the shot where "Mitch Evers" trips on the chair, he fell so hard, he cracked a rib, and kept right on with the scene. The actor was a true professional.

Susan Henning took on the role as the star's body double for many of the twin shots in the movie. As part of her contract, she signed away her rights to be credited. At the wrap party, Walt Disney presented her with a small statue of Donald Duck, called "The Duckster", in recognition of the "best unseen performance on film."   The star later said that Henning taught her to speak like a "California girl."

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Okay.  Time to add an obvious clue:

A remake of this 1960s movie was made in the late 1990s.  Only three of the original cast lived long enough to see the remake.  One cast member appears in both films.

In the dance party scene, where the layer cake falls off the beak of the totem pole and drops onto Miss Inch's face, writer and director David Swift originally wanted to cut the shot of the cake-fall. But when producer Walt Disney saw the rushes, he told Swift to leave the shot in, saying it would be the biggest laugh in the movie. Turns out, Walt was right.

In the shot where "Mitch Evers" trips on the chair, he fell so hard, he cracked a rib, and kept right on with the scene. The actor was a true professional.

Susan Henning took on the role as the star's body double for many of the twin shots in the movie. As part of her contract, she signed away her rights to be credited. At the wrap party, Walt Disney presented her with a small statue of Donald Duck, called "The Duckster", in recognition of the "best unseen performance on film."   The star later said that Henning taught her to speak like a "California girl."

The stars were Hayley Mills, Hayley Mills, and Brian Keith.

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...