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Are you buying silver and gold with your extra cash?


oldiesman
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7 hours ago, Bolshevik said:

And don't get me started on flourine. (PFAS)  Those things are tough.

I'm looking at YOU, recycling hippie types.

The gravity filters have flouride filter options... never used one though...

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1 hour ago, oldiesman said:

The gravity filters have flouride filter options... never used one though...

Why???  I can't hold it in.

Fluoride is an anion.  The conjugate base of weak acid.  

Fluorine is a neutral element.  I used it as a general shorthand for fluoridated hydrocarbons and their many acronyms, which resist decomposition and are flame retardant and whatnot.  They are found in products which then end up in the environment . . . So that people can get upset about it and regulations can be made and more ponies distributed.

 

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17 hours ago, oldiesman said:

I'd like to know if the Hudson River in Poughkeepsie is potable because I can walk to it from where I live, will ask.

The Hudson River is not potable.  First, it is an ESTUARY (not, strictly, a river, just like the East "River.") So, it contains not just the fresh-water river from upstate, but it also contains seawater, so, that changes everything and introduces all sorts of contaminants into the Hudson.  Second, in the 20th century, it was used for transport and other industrial things- including General Electric dumping PCBs into the water for about 40 years.  (Other sources added their own "contributions" like mercury and raw sewage.)   The Hudson has previously been declared a SUPERFUND site, something only really disastrous places get declared, places that need lots of toxic cleanup immediately.  So, unlike the aquifers, treating the Hudson wouldn't result in potable drinking water.  Treating water from the aquifers DOES result in potable drinking water, and that's why NYC has clean drinking water coming from its taps.

 

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8 minutes ago, Bolshevik said:

Here you go Oldies . . . when not divining for water you can fight off the zombies

 

LINK

 

Have no idea what this is?    You mean I go walk around and try to find ground water in the neighborhood?

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25 minutes ago, oldiesman said:

Have no idea what this is?    You mean I go walk around and try to find ground water in the neighborhood?

You drive it into the ground, the groundwater seeps in, and you pump it out.  Something  homesteaders and ranchers might use.  Also, you might actually be seeing lots of these and not notice them in locations where the groundwater is being tested.  (Above ground they are just a pipe with a lid on it, and a lock)

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That's called a well point. You drive it into the ground by hand with a post hole driver, taking care to protect the threaded end. When you've driven it into the ground to a sufficient depth, you attach another section of pipe and continue doing so until you reach the water table (top most limit of the aquafer). You then continue passed that point to a depth that will insure it can continually supply water. At that time, you can  connect it to a hand pump or a shallow well jet pump. Shallow well pumps don't generally function for depths greater  than 25 feet, due to the laws of physics involved with atmospheric pressure. (There are ways to get slightly more depth, such driving it in a well pit  .) They can be very useful in certain applications but are typically inadequate as a source of drinking water. It important to note that, even through you reach a steady water source, that source may be fed by surface water, which you would never want to drink untreated. An understanding of the fundamental differences between surface water and groundwater should precede attempting this.

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1 hour ago, Bolshevik said:

Also, you might actually be seeing lots of these and not notice them in locations where the groundwater is being tested.  (Above ground they are just a pipe with a lid on it, and a lock)

These are called monitor wells and use a more standard size deep well, submersible pump set up. You would expect to find these in locations where the ground water is being monitored for potential contamination, such as near a gas station, car wash or facility that uses lots of potential contaminants. They have a locking cap to prevent tampering (vandalism). You usually don't leave a pump in them unless they are tested frequently. When you're ready to test, you typically drop a submersible pump in and connect it to a portable generator.

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https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/how-can-i-find-depth-water-table-specific-location

 

9 minutes ago, waysider said:

These are called monitor wells and use a more standard size deep well, submersible pump set up. You would expect to find these in locations where the ground water is being monitored for potential contamination, such as near a gas station, car wash or facility that uses lots of potential contaminants. They have a locking cap to prevent tampering (vandalism). You usually don't leave a pump in them unless they are tested frequently. When you're ready to test, you typically drop a submersible pump in and connect it to a portable generator.

That is correct.  I've used a couple methods, sometimes using a simple bailer.  

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3 hours ago, oldiesman said:

This is one thing I won't be doing anytime soon...  LOL

BBC12CAN.JPG

Good time to take up canning.  You have to harvest it just as it ripens.  If you over do it it gets mushy.

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Or you could "old-school it"…and I mean really "old-school it"…just look at the   origin of water on earth    …remember the number one investigative rule: follow  the   money   water…anyway, if that’s too primeval (Prime evil – take that Amazon  :dance: )    just reverse the direction of the arrows in this little gizmo and you’re making water like a champ!

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I’ve dealt with long term water storage treatments:   Aquamira Water Treatment    the label claims it will make 60 gallons of treated water safe to drink for up to 5 years as long as the container stays sealed  so no additional contamination can get in.

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1 hour ago, T-Bone said:

Or you could "old-school it"…and I mean really "old-school it"…just look at the   origin of water on earth    …remember the number one investigative rule: follow  the   money   water…anyway, if that’s too primeval (Prime evil – take that Amazon  :dance: )    just reverse the direction of the arrows in this little gizmo and you’re making water like a champ!

U6vqI4=&risl=&pid=ImgRaw&r=0&sres=1&sres

You'd need a hydrogen source . . .  I just looked and there's still two hydrogen fuel cell vehicles on the market.

There you go Oldies, get a hydrogen fuel cell car, and drink the emissions.

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1 hour ago, oldiesman said:

How long do you believe unopened bottled water stays potable?

Two years is the generally accepted shelf life of bottled water. (less if it's "fizzy" water, as the fizz will escape through the bottle walls.) Some companies put an expiration date on the label. The answer to whether it's still potable after that date gets a little bit hazy. Several factors come into play. Heat, exposure to sunlight and the chemical composition of the container all contribute to the answer. Plastics slowly degrade over time and various components of the bottle's plastic can leach into contents of the bottle. Heat and sunlight can accelerate that process. Even if you don't store the water long enough to generate health concerns, you may find it to have acquired an unpleasant "flat" taste.

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1 hour ago, oldiesman said:

How long do you believe unopened bottled water stays potable?

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=165.110&SearchTerm=bottled water

The canned water companies claim 30-50 year shelf life.

As far as I know, there's no FDA requirement for a bottled water expiration.

Keep in mind aluminum cans are typically treated with plastic.  As are paper cups.

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9 minutes ago, Bolshevik said:

You'd need a hydrogen source . . .  I just looked and there's still two hydrogen fuel cell vehicles on the market.

There you go Oldies, get a hydrogen fuel cell car, and drink the emissions.

:biglaugh:

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When you are calculating anticipated water usage for a household, you typically figure an average of about 90 gallons per day, per adult.  That probably seems like a lot, but it includes drinking, laundry, toilets, dishes, etc. I think that puts into perspective how unrealistic some survivalist type plans can become.

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23 hours ago, Rocky said:

 

lol . . not sure this is how they do it

I analyze wells from many states.  In each case the state decides where to drill, I think, if not the EPA.  Sometimes industrial waste gets into the groundwater and we have to test on private land nearby . . . for decades if not centuries.  

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4 minutes ago, Bolshevik said:

Sometimes industrial waste gets into the groundwater and we have to test on private land nearby . . . for decades if not centuries. 

Yeah, that's just it. Even if witching worked, how would you know if you'd found a safe and sustainable source? In other words ,if water was close enough to the surface to be detected by witching, there's a pretty good chance it would actually be contaminated surface water that's formed a pseudo aquafer, rather than true groundwater.

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