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Just because the Way didn't like it....


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Merry Christmas!

And the name "Christmas" comes from the "Mass" one attended.

lcm's delusions to the contrary, it was a term referring to the day

(like Michaelmas and Candlemas.)

lcm somehow came up with the hallucination that it referred to the

mass-acre of the innocents when Herod wanted the King of the Jews dead.

(Or any of his other comments on the day- "Happy Kill-Christ Day,

celebrating the death of Christ..." )

=================

We must condemn the other Christians! They took a secular holiday, changed the name,

and made a few tweaks, and celebrated it as a holiday!

What will WE do about

Christmas

Valentines Day

other holidays?

Well, let's change the name and make a few tweaks, then celebrate them as holidays.

During the holiday, we can also delight in how we're better than other Christians...

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My wife was at the gym few days ago when someone else said merry Christmas to a third person at the gym. Third person got really offended, said "how DARE you say that to me?" Weird.

Yes, even back in the mid 80s one could be reproved by ministry clergy for saying merry Christmas or happy Easter. LCM would say merry Christ is dead! In the 90s he was even mad that the days of the week were all named after pagan things, though. He was apparently going to save Christianity with his stand. Jeez, it's just a positive greeting.

If I said 'break a leg' to someone, does that mean I want them to be injured?

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I never heard even the dim LCM say anything about "mass"acre.

I believe it may come from the old English (and before that, probably old German or Norse or some such) "mass" or "mess" meaning meal. As in a mess (dining or common room) in military terms.

A "mass" in religious terms is where the eucharistic tokens of bread/wafer and wine are taken, symbolising a "meal" and most commonly seen in "communion" services of Protestant churches and still called "mass" by RCs.

Over time, the name for the type of service associated with the "meal" service has become the name for the type of service itself regardless of whether "mess" or "meal" is taken.

But anyway...

Happy Christmas, and a bright New Year to all.

Have an enjoyable holiday break (if working) and may 2011 bring you an increase in personal satisfaction with life, in whatever form that takes for you.

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quote: Over time, the name for the type of service associated with the "meal" service has become the name for the type of service itself regardless of whether "mess" or "meal" is taken.

In Gen. 43:34 the word 'mess' refers to the portion size of what they were eating. Interesting.

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I never heard even the dim LCM say anything about "mass"acre.

(snip)

He's the only one I ever heard say it. I'd heard him on at least one tape saying that.

He's the only one DUMB enough to pull it.

Although when I was brand-new, I heard someone say it in passing to someone else.

Apparently, they picked it up from lcm's tapes.

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Middle English (ie, between Chaucer and Shakespeare) gives a definition relating to the meaning of "mass" as intricately linked to "feast days" in the church.

Somewhat later than Middle English, the word "mass" came to mean an amorphous lump of material (including food - like dough, or stew - the "mess of pottage") - then came "mass" meaning a lot of people came into use. This meaning had more recently been acquired - but was in use by 1604 - and had been acquired by the time the KJV was prepared.

In other words, "Christ-mass" is a meal to celebrate Christ.

And at what other time of year do we eat so much, as at Christmas?

It's really a Christian overlay on a very much more ancient pagan aor animist traditions to do with Yule logs, trees, and fertility. Probably with other overlays of Greek and Roman pre-Christian fertility rites and orgies - Bacchanalia and all that.

Gotta keep yourself warm on cold winter nights somehow!

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My wife was at the gym few days ago when someone else said merry Christmas to a third person at the gym. Third person got really offended, said "how DARE you say that to me?" Weird.

Yes, even back in the mid 80s one could be reproved by ministry clergy for saying merry Christmas or happy Easter. LCM would say merry Christ is dead! In the 90s he was even mad that the days of the week were all named after pagan things, though. He was apparently going to save Christianity with his stand. Jeez, it's just a positive greeting.

If I said 'break a leg' to someone, does that mean I want them to be injured?

I like the comment someone made satirically: Terrorist say Happy Holidays.

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I work with the public and I say Happy Holidays for a couple reasons. First, I have no desire to know their religious affiliations. Secondly, the phrase really encompasses the whole holiday season, rather than one specific day or celebration.

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Johniam, perhaps the person who was offended was Jewish or some other religion.

At the doctor's office last week, I heard one of the office staff lecturing the others about how Christmas was based on a pagan holiday and Jesus was really born in June. She sooooo reminded me of a zealous Wayfer. If she had said he was born in September, I'd have asked her if she had a green card.

The other people just looked at her as if to say, "Well, merry f'n Christmas to you, too, ya big spoilsport. :biglaugh:

I know I've told this story before, but one of my favorite anecdotes about Mrs. Owens relates to this thread. At the annual HQ Christmas party, the trustees and wives did a reception line to greet everyone arriving at the party. When one of my friends (who had worked with Mrs. Owens on several occasions) went through the line, Mrs. Owens leaned close to her and said quietly, "Merry Christmas." I can just see the twinkle in her eyes.

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Ah, the mysteries and histories of Christmas! And a most merry one to all!

waysider, that's about how I address the seasonal greets myself.

Christmas does seem to be a mix of many customs rolled into one to accomodate a diverse group. Possibly then as now, merchants embraced the opportunity to sell some more tunics and sandals. "Move the cards and the pottery from Egypt! 25 % off - red tag 'em, the Spring lines get ordered next month!" Politicians who wanted to keep the peace and what better way than to birth the Prince of Peace - who doesn't love a baby? (well, that one guy) Memorialized forever in quiet slumber surrounded by loving parents, visitors from afar bearing gifts ("...diaper service! You rock! We love you!!!"), shepherds and of course, sheep.

Outside and in days to come the world awaits but tonight the stars twinkle, the plants align and for a few hours it's all family, all love and all good. With family and friends, the unexpected but warmly embraced guests, a hot meal, some selected beverages and a good night's sleep and you've got a really nice time.

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I know I've told this story before, but one of my favorite anecdotes about Mrs. Owens relates to this thread. At the annual HQ Christmas party, the trustees and wives did a reception line to greet everyone arriving at the party. When one of my friends (who had worked with Mrs. Owens on several occasions) went through the line, Mrs. Owens leaned close to her and said quietly, "Merry Christmas." I can just see the twinkle in her eyes.

I always liked Mrs. Owens, she was a lot of fun.

I never heard LCM talking about it being a celebration of when Herod massacred the children in Bethlehem. What a ridiculous statement.

This business of not saying "Merry Christmas" was from Wierwille who said that "Christmas", was "Christ-mass", which was celebrating the death of Christ. Huh? Even then, in my brain-washed state, I felt we were "straining a gnat and swallowing a camel".

Edited by Broken Arrow
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Hm. I was raised being taught Christ was born in Sept and Christmas was a pagan holiday, etc etc. (Pretty much what everyone else said.) However, my Mother always said we Celebrated Christmas for the tradition and love as a family. So we still celebrated and still said, "Merry Christmas" and she let my baby brother believe in Santa Claus when he got old enough to catch the idea from daycare. But of course she wasn't connected to the HQ and taught us in our home with old tapes from the beginning and her classes and she loved nothing more than to find what she'd call "loop holes" in the Bible haha. I had no idea it was such a big deal. We always had a great Christmas. :)

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I never heard even the dim LCM say anything about "mass"acre.

I believe it may come from the old English (and before that, probably old German or Norse or some such) "mass" or "mess" meaning meal. As in a mess (dining or common room) in military terms.

A "mass" in religious terms is where the eucharistic tokens of bread/wafer and wine are taken, symbolising a "meal" and most commonly seen in "communion" services of Protestant churches and still called "mass" by RCs.

Over time, the name for the type of service associated with the "meal" service has become the name for the type of service itself regardless of whether "mess" or "meal" is taken.

But anyway...

Happy Christmas, and a bright New Year to all.

Have an enjoyable holiday break (if working) and may 2011 bring you an increase in personal satisfaction with life, in whatever form that takes for you.

Hope you had a Merry Christmas.

Actually, the word "Mass" comes from the dismissal in the Latin Liturgy

Ite missa est

Meaning, "go, it is the dismissal"

The word "missa" comes from the Latin "mitto", to dismiss/to send off. (You can read the full entry on the word from Lewis & Short)

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Ye , Mark, I've heard that as an explanation too.

I think I prefer the "meal" explanation especially since even now RCs celebrate with a "meal" - symbolic tokens of wafer and wine. And Christmas is renownedly a time of feasting and celebration...albeit on a pagan foundation.

Welcome, POAE, you've joined just in time to hear the bolts of the Cafe door as it closes for the first and last time. Enjoy your short stay, and let me shout you a glass of something tasty. Does your screen name mean something special?

post-1745-038387900 1293734696_thumb.jpe

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