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 I have now almost finished the writing of a biblical study book with the title of "Our Loving Savior Jesus Christ", which may be printed for commercial use. Most of the content I am confident you will agree with. Perhaps as high as 98% or after reading the content and comparing to bible versions, maybe higher. The problem I have now is after learning from Greek words and their definitions or confirming what I already believed about their definitions, I wonder if I will be able to copy these definitions to my book, while giving them clearly written credit for their definitions? For example, two Greek Dictionaries that I use called the Vine's Expository Dictionary and the Thayer's Greek Lexicon. I am having trouble contacting the companies that may have the copyright status. What are your views on giving them credit for their definitions while copying some of their Greek word definitions to the chapters of my book for commercial use? Or should I reword their Greek definitions with my own wording, which might be more clearly understood?  Does anyone here have legal information on this?

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2 hours ago, Mark Sanguinetti said:

 I have now almost finished the writing of a biblical study book with the title of "Our Loving Savior Jesus Christ", which may be printed for commercial use. Most of the content I am confident you will agree with. Perhaps as high as 98% or after reading the content and comparing to bible versions, maybe higher. The problem I have now is after learning from Greek words and their definitions or confirming what I already believed about their definitions, I wonder if I will be able to copy these definitions to my book, while giving them clearly written credit for their definitions? For example, two Greek Dictionaries that I use called the Vine's Expository Dictionary and the Thayer's Greek Lexicon. I am having trouble contacting the companies that may have the copyright status. What are your views on giving them credit for their definitions while copying some of their Greek word definitions to the chapters of my book for commercial use? Or should I reword their Greek definitions with my own wording, which might be more clearly understood?  Does anyone here have legal information on this?

Sounds like you need legal advice from someone conversant with publishing/copyright/intellectual property law. 

I would be very skeptical of any such advice on the subject you might get here.

Edited by Rocky
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6 hours ago, Rocky said:

Sounds like you need legal advice from someone conversant with publishing/copyright/intellectual property law. 

I would be very skeptical of any such advice on the subject you might get here.

Thank you Rocky for your feedback. In research so far when using my brain. I need to contact organizations or corporations that have received or perhaps purchased the copyright of the documents that I can quote from to get their approval or at least their feedback. The problem now is that it is very difficult to contact them. Perhaps at least in part because of the virus. The organizations should at least let me compliment them for their definitions while I write that their definitions of Greek words are very factual and that they confirm what I already believed before reading their definitions.  Then using my own words for the definitions. Here is an example of the definitions that I copied from the BibleSoft software. I can not even now contact BibleSoft Software. I tried contacting them through their web site yesterday without hearing back from them today. I tried to get their phone number with no success now, perhaps because of the crazy virus. 

Quote

OT:7585  she°ol

 "place of the dead." Sha°al seems to be the basis for an important noun in the Old Testament, she°ol. Found 65 times in the Hebrew Bible, she°ol refers to the netherworld or the underground cavern to which all buried dead go. Often incorrectly translated "hell" in the KJV, she°ol was not understood to be a place of punishment, but simply the ultimate resting place of all mankind Genesis 37:35. Thus, it was thought to be the land of no return Job 16:22; 17:14-16. It was a place to be dreaded, not only because it meant the end of physical life on earth, but also because there was no praise of God there Psalms 6:5. Deliverance from it was a blessing Psalms 30:3.

In some instances, it may be a symbol of distress or even plague; it is often used in parallel with "the Pit," another symbol of destruction. Everything about she°ol was negative, so it is little wonder that the concept of hell developed from it in the intertestamental and New Testament literature.

(from Vine's Expository Dictionary of Biblical Words, Copyright © 1985, Thomas Nelson Publishers.)

From internet research Vine's was originally written by William Vine with completion in 1940. The Thomas Nelson Publishers perhaps gained copyright of this. I am trying to contact them also via the internet with no success. I wonder if the covid-19 virus also spread to the internet, but I do not think so. Sarcasm by Marky!

Edited by Mark Sanguinetti
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Well, well.  Vine's.  Was written in part, I believe, by the very late father of a late client of mine.  I still work for her son, who has the volumes of the books that were written.

Bu it's so old now.  Is it still subject to intellectual property / copyright law?

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1 hour ago, Twinky said:

Well, well.  Vine's.  Was written in part, I believe, by the very late father of a late client of mine.  I still work for her son, who has the volumes of the books that were written.

Bu it's so old now.  Is it still subject to intellectual property / copyright law?

Thank you Twinky. It would be good for me to contact PC BibleSoft Software or Thomas Nelson Publishers , but no success so far. Yes, it likely took a number of people to do the research work for this. 

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At least the Thayer's Greek Lexicon is NOT subject to intellectual property / copyright law, because it was published before 1923.  However, the Vine's Expository Dictionary may be subject to copyright law because it was first published in 1940. Perhaps the Thomas Nelson Publishers purchased this. Difficult contacting them.

In doing a Google search, I just found out that Thomas Nelson Publishers was acquired or purchased by Harper Collins Publishers. I can perhaps at least contact this publisher. I will try to do that by phone call soon.

Edited by Mark Sanguinetti
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